Limits...
Operational strategies to achieve and maintain malaria elimination.

Moonen B, Cohen JM, Snow RW, Slutsker L, Drakeley C, Smith DL, Abeyasinghe RR, Rodriguez MH, Maharaj R, Tanner M, Targett G - Lancet (2010)

Bottom Line: Present elimination strategies are based on recommendations derived during the Global Malaria Eradication Program of the 1960s.However, many countries considering elimination nowadays have high intrinsic transmission potential and, without the support of a regional campaign, have to deal with the constant threat of imported cases of the disease, emphasising the need to revisit the strategies on which contemporary elimination programmes are based.Draining of infectious pools entirely will not be sufficient since they could be replenished by imported malaria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinton Health Access Initiative, Nairobi, Kenya. bmoonen@clintonhealthaccess.org

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of passive case detection on transmission is limited by a cascade of factorsThe percentage of infections identified through passive case detection depends on the proportion of new infections that produce clinical symptoms, the proportion of clinical cases that seek treatment in a reporting facility, the proportion of treatment-seeking cases that are tested for malaria, and the sensitivity and quality (performance) of diagnostic tests. Furthermore, the effect of passive case detection on transmission will depend on the proportion of infections identified by diagnostics that are prescribed and receive appropriate treatment, the proportion of those receiving treatment that adhere to it, and the efficacy of the drug.
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fig1: Effect of passive case detection on transmission is limited by a cascade of factorsThe percentage of infections identified through passive case detection depends on the proportion of new infections that produce clinical symptoms, the proportion of clinical cases that seek treatment in a reporting facility, the proportion of treatment-seeking cases that are tested for malaria, and the sensitivity and quality (performance) of diagnostic tests. Furthermore, the effect of passive case detection on transmission will depend on the proportion of infections identified by diagnostics that are prescribed and receive appropriate treatment, the proportion of those receiving treatment that adhere to it, and the efficacy of the drug.

Mentions: Passive case detection involves a system in which data are routinely received by a central health authority based on a set of rules and laws that need a health-care provider or health facility to report some diseases or disorders on an ongoing basis and at specific intervals (weekly, monthly, yearly).29 During the GMEP, health systems were generally considered to have little geographical coverage and thus generally to be insufficient for surveillance for elimination.27,30,31 Additionally, apart from limitations related to the precision of the diagnostic methods and completeness of treatment, passive case detection has other inherent weaknesses in detection of all new infections in the population (figure 1). For Zanzibar, taking into account the factors shown in figure 1, passive case detection is estimated to identify at best 40% of all new infections.14


Operational strategies to achieve and maintain malaria elimination.

Moonen B, Cohen JM, Snow RW, Slutsker L, Drakeley C, Smith DL, Abeyasinghe RR, Rodriguez MH, Maharaj R, Tanner M, Targett G - Lancet (2010)

Effect of passive case detection on transmission is limited by a cascade of factorsThe percentage of infections identified through passive case detection depends on the proportion of new infections that produce clinical symptoms, the proportion of clinical cases that seek treatment in a reporting facility, the proportion of treatment-seeking cases that are tested for malaria, and the sensitivity and quality (performance) of diagnostic tests. Furthermore, the effect of passive case detection on transmission will depend on the proportion of infections identified by diagnostics that are prescribed and receive appropriate treatment, the proportion of those receiving treatment that adhere to it, and the efficacy of the drug.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037542&req=5

fig1: Effect of passive case detection on transmission is limited by a cascade of factorsThe percentage of infections identified through passive case detection depends on the proportion of new infections that produce clinical symptoms, the proportion of clinical cases that seek treatment in a reporting facility, the proportion of treatment-seeking cases that are tested for malaria, and the sensitivity and quality (performance) of diagnostic tests. Furthermore, the effect of passive case detection on transmission will depend on the proportion of infections identified by diagnostics that are prescribed and receive appropriate treatment, the proportion of those receiving treatment that adhere to it, and the efficacy of the drug.
Mentions: Passive case detection involves a system in which data are routinely received by a central health authority based on a set of rules and laws that need a health-care provider or health facility to report some diseases or disorders on an ongoing basis and at specific intervals (weekly, monthly, yearly).29 During the GMEP, health systems were generally considered to have little geographical coverage and thus generally to be insufficient for surveillance for elimination.27,30,31 Additionally, apart from limitations related to the precision of the diagnostic methods and completeness of treatment, passive case detection has other inherent weaknesses in detection of all new infections in the population (figure 1). For Zanzibar, taking into account the factors shown in figure 1, passive case detection is estimated to identify at best 40% of all new infections.14

Bottom Line: Present elimination strategies are based on recommendations derived during the Global Malaria Eradication Program of the 1960s.However, many countries considering elimination nowadays have high intrinsic transmission potential and, without the support of a regional campaign, have to deal with the constant threat of imported cases of the disease, emphasising the need to revisit the strategies on which contemporary elimination programmes are based.Draining of infectious pools entirely will not be sufficient since they could be replenished by imported malaria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinton Health Access Initiative, Nairobi, Kenya. bmoonen@clintonhealthaccess.org

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus