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Representation of reward feedback in primate auditory cortex.

Brosch M, Selezneva E, Scheich H - Front Syst Neurosci (2011)

Bottom Line: Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback.Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water.Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institut für Neurobiologie Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
It is well established that auditory cortex is plastic on different time scales and that this plasticity is driven by the reinforcement that is used to motivate subjects to learn or to perform an auditory task. Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback. We recorded from the auditory cortex of two monkeys while they were performing an auditory categorization task. Monkeys listened to a sequence of tones and had to signal when the frequency of adjacent tones stepped in downward direction, irrespective of the tone frequency and step size. Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water. The size of reward depended on the monkeys' performance in the previous trial: it was large after a correct trial and small after an incorrect trial. The rewards served to maintain task performance. During task performance we found three successive periods of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that reflected (1) the reward expectancy for each trial, (2) the reward-size received, and (3) the mismatch between the expected and delivered reward. These results, together with control experiments suggest that auditory cortex receives reward feedback that could be used to adapt auditory cortex to task requirements. Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Grand average response in auditory cortex for six relationships between the reward in a trial and that in the preceding trial. Reward increases: red (small reward followed by large reward) and pale red (no reward followed by small reward); no reward changes: green (large reward followed by large reward) and pale green (no reward followed by no reward); reward decreases: blue (large reward followed by no reward) and pale blue (small reward followed by no reward). Symbols as in Figure 2.
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Figure 8: Grand average response in auditory cortex for six relationships between the reward in a trial and that in the preceding trial. Reward increases: red (small reward followed by large reward) and pale red (no reward followed by small reward); no reward changes: green (large reward followed by large reward) and pale green (no reward followed by no reward); reward decreases: blue (large reward followed by no reward) and pale blue (small reward followed by no reward). Symbols as in Figure 2.

Mentions: We could rule out that late reward-related firing reflected information that was based on directly comparing the reward received in a trial with that received in the preceding trial. With analogy to findings in dopaminergic neurons (Schultz, 2007), we hypothesized that the reward for the preceding trial was memorized such that any change of reward led to a change in firing. Sorted in this way, late responses only partially support this scheme (Figure 8). As expected, late responses were not observed for two successive large rewards, but were present when a large or a small reward was followed by no reward. Contrary to the hypothesis, no late responses occurred when a small reward was followed by a large reward, or when no reward was followed by a small reward, i.e., when the reward increased in size. Also contrary to the hypothesis, late responses did occur in two successive trials with no rewards.


Representation of reward feedback in primate auditory cortex.

Brosch M, Selezneva E, Scheich H - Front Syst Neurosci (2011)

Grand average response in auditory cortex for six relationships between the reward in a trial and that in the preceding trial. Reward increases: red (small reward followed by large reward) and pale red (no reward followed by small reward); no reward changes: green (large reward followed by large reward) and pale green (no reward followed by no reward); reward decreases: blue (large reward followed by no reward) and pale blue (small reward followed by no reward). Symbols as in Figure 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037499&req=5

Figure 8: Grand average response in auditory cortex for six relationships between the reward in a trial and that in the preceding trial. Reward increases: red (small reward followed by large reward) and pale red (no reward followed by small reward); no reward changes: green (large reward followed by large reward) and pale green (no reward followed by no reward); reward decreases: blue (large reward followed by no reward) and pale blue (small reward followed by no reward). Symbols as in Figure 2.
Mentions: We could rule out that late reward-related firing reflected information that was based on directly comparing the reward received in a trial with that received in the preceding trial. With analogy to findings in dopaminergic neurons (Schultz, 2007), we hypothesized that the reward for the preceding trial was memorized such that any change of reward led to a change in firing. Sorted in this way, late responses only partially support this scheme (Figure 8). As expected, late responses were not observed for two successive large rewards, but were present when a large or a small reward was followed by no reward. Contrary to the hypothesis, no late responses occurred when a small reward was followed by a large reward, or when no reward was followed by a small reward, i.e., when the reward increased in size. Also contrary to the hypothesis, late responses did occur in two successive trials with no rewards.

Bottom Line: Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback.Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water.Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institut für Neurobiologie Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
It is well established that auditory cortex is plastic on different time scales and that this plasticity is driven by the reinforcement that is used to motivate subjects to learn or to perform an auditory task. Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback. We recorded from the auditory cortex of two monkeys while they were performing an auditory categorization task. Monkeys listened to a sequence of tones and had to signal when the frequency of adjacent tones stepped in downward direction, irrespective of the tone frequency and step size. Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water. The size of reward depended on the monkeys' performance in the previous trial: it was large after a correct trial and small after an incorrect trial. The rewards served to maintain task performance. During task performance we found three successive periods of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that reflected (1) the reward expectancy for each trial, (2) the reward-size received, and (3) the mismatch between the expected and delivered reward. These results, together with control experiments suggest that auditory cortex receives reward feedback that could be used to adapt auditory cortex to task requirements. Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus