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Myofeedback training and intensive muscular strength training to decrease pain and improve work ability among female workers on long-term sick leave with neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

Dellve L, Ahlstrom L, Jonsson A, Sandsjö L, Forsman M, Lindegård A, Ahlstrand C, Kadefors R, Hagberg M - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2010)

Bottom Line: Decreased pain was also associated with increased self-rated work ability at 1-month follow-up.Myofeedback was associated with increased observed work ability and self- rated vitality.The two interventions showed positive results, suggesting that they could be developed for use in health care practice to address pain and work ability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 414, 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. lotta.dellve@amm.gu.se

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: The theoretical framework is that muscle tension in the neck is related to insufficient muscular rest and is a risk factor for chronic pain and reduced work ability. Promoting muscle strength and muscle rest may increase work ability and reduce neck pain.

Objectives: To test whether myofeedback training or intensive strength training leads to decreased pain and increased work ability in women on long-term sick leave.

Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial of two 1-month interventions with myofeedback or muscular strength training in the home environment. Female human service organization workers (n = 60) on long-term (>60 days) sick leave and with chronic neck pain were followed with self-reported and laboratory-observed data of health, pain, muscular activation, and work ability, at baseline, immediately after the intervention and 3 months after baseline.

Results: For both intervention groups, pain was lowered over time compared with the control group. Decreased pain and muscular activity was associated with increased self-rated work ability and with laboratory-observed work ability at 3-month follow-up. Decreased pain was also associated with increased self-rated work ability at 1-month follow-up. Muscular strength training was associated with increased self-rated work ability and mental health. Myofeedback was associated with increased observed work ability and self- rated vitality.

Conclusions: The two interventions showed positive results, suggesting that they could be developed for use in health care practice to address pain and work ability. The intensive muscular strength training program, which is both easy to conduct at home and easy to coach, was associated with increased work ability.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Some of the exercises in the intensive muscular strength training programme
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Fig3: Some of the exercises in the intensive muscular strength training programme

Mentions: The participants learned a structured 5–10-minute program to be performed twice a day for 6 days/week. The program began with two warm-up movements, followed by four exercises for strengthening and coordinating the upper extremities (Fig. 3). The last two exercises included breathing and slow down movements. The chosen sample of exercises has been frequently used in similar programs where the aim has been to increase strength in pain-inflicted muscles. In order to increase the compliance, the participants were “coached” by the ergonomist during the intervention period through personal visits in their homes (twice) and by additional phone calls twice a week.Fig. 3


Myofeedback training and intensive muscular strength training to decrease pain and improve work ability among female workers on long-term sick leave with neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

Dellve L, Ahlstrom L, Jonsson A, Sandsjö L, Forsman M, Lindegård A, Ahlstrand C, Kadefors R, Hagberg M - Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2010)

Some of the exercises in the intensive muscular strength training programme
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037486&req=5

Fig3: Some of the exercises in the intensive muscular strength training programme
Mentions: The participants learned a structured 5–10-minute program to be performed twice a day for 6 days/week. The program began with two warm-up movements, followed by four exercises for strengthening and coordinating the upper extremities (Fig. 3). The last two exercises included breathing and slow down movements. The chosen sample of exercises has been frequently used in similar programs where the aim has been to increase strength in pain-inflicted muscles. In order to increase the compliance, the participants were “coached” by the ergonomist during the intervention period through personal visits in their homes (twice) and by additional phone calls twice a week.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Decreased pain was also associated with increased self-rated work ability at 1-month follow-up.Myofeedback was associated with increased observed work ability and self- rated vitality.The two interventions showed positive results, suggesting that they could be developed for use in health care practice to address pain and work ability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 414, 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. lotta.dellve@amm.gu.se

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: The theoretical framework is that muscle tension in the neck is related to insufficient muscular rest and is a risk factor for chronic pain and reduced work ability. Promoting muscle strength and muscle rest may increase work ability and reduce neck pain.

Objectives: To test whether myofeedback training or intensive strength training leads to decreased pain and increased work ability in women on long-term sick leave.

Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial of two 1-month interventions with myofeedback or muscular strength training in the home environment. Female human service organization workers (n = 60) on long-term (>60 days) sick leave and with chronic neck pain were followed with self-reported and laboratory-observed data of health, pain, muscular activation, and work ability, at baseline, immediately after the intervention and 3 months after baseline.

Results: For both intervention groups, pain was lowered over time compared with the control group. Decreased pain and muscular activity was associated with increased self-rated work ability and with laboratory-observed work ability at 3-month follow-up. Decreased pain was also associated with increased self-rated work ability at 1-month follow-up. Muscular strength training was associated with increased self-rated work ability and mental health. Myofeedback was associated with increased observed work ability and self- rated vitality.

Conclusions: The two interventions showed positive results, suggesting that they could be developed for use in health care practice to address pain and work ability. The intensive muscular strength training program, which is both easy to conduct at home and easy to coach, was associated with increased work ability.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus