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Seeing faces as objects: no face inversion effect with geometrical discrimination.

Pallett PM, MacLeod DI - Atten Percept Psychophys (2011)

Bottom Line: Yet it does not interfere with the ability to make precise estimates of facial feature distances.The results clearly showed that geometrical face discrimination is not subject to the traditional face inversion effect and did not show a benefit for natural faces.Based on these counterintuitive results, we suggest that participants used analytical processing to do the discrimination task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, 6207 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. pamela.m.pallett@dartmouth.edu

ABSTRACT
Inversion dramatically impairs face perception, recognition, and discrimination. Yet it does not interfere with the ability to make precise estimates of facial feature distances. To investigate this discontinuity between facial feature distance estimation and general perception and recognition, we assessed the effect of inversion on the discrimination of differences in facial compression and elongation or expansion using geometrically distorted faces. The results clearly showed that geometrical face discrimination is not subject to the traditional face inversion effect and did not show a benefit for natural faces. Although discrimination thresholds were not affected by inversion, response times to the distance judgments were faster with inversion, especially when the inverted faces contained natural configurations. Based on these counterintuitive results, we suggest that participants used analytical processing to do the discrimination task. Moreover, we suggest that the depth with which a face is holistically encoded depends on the nature of the task, face orientation, and similarity between a face and the prototypical face template.

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Discrimination results for Experiment 2A. Smaller thresholds indicate better discrimination of vertical spacing change. Error bars 95% confidence interval, n = 46. Upright face discrimination (diamonds), inverted face discrimination (squares), and contrast-negated face discrimination (triangles)
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Fig4: Discrimination results for Experiment 2A. Smaller thresholds indicate better discrimination of vertical spacing change. Error bars 95% confidence interval, n = 46. Upright face discrimination (diamonds), inverted face discrimination (squares), and contrast-negated face discrimination (triangles)

Mentions: There was no prohibitory effect of inversion or contrast-negation on the discrimination of differences in facial feature distances,2p = .81. Experiment 2A completely replicated Experiment 1. There was no main effect or significant interactions with judgment order; therefore this was removed as a factor in the data analysis. Table 3 contains the threshold means and standard deviations for discrimination, and Fig. 4 displays the threshold profiles for each face type.Fig. 4


Seeing faces as objects: no face inversion effect with geometrical discrimination.

Pallett PM, MacLeod DI - Atten Percept Psychophys (2011)

Discrimination results for Experiment 2A. Smaller thresholds indicate better discrimination of vertical spacing change. Error bars 95% confidence interval, n = 46. Upright face discrimination (diamonds), inverted face discrimination (squares), and contrast-negated face discrimination (triangles)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037484&req=5

Fig4: Discrimination results for Experiment 2A. Smaller thresholds indicate better discrimination of vertical spacing change. Error bars 95% confidence interval, n = 46. Upright face discrimination (diamonds), inverted face discrimination (squares), and contrast-negated face discrimination (triangles)
Mentions: There was no prohibitory effect of inversion or contrast-negation on the discrimination of differences in facial feature distances,2p = .81. Experiment 2A completely replicated Experiment 1. There was no main effect or significant interactions with judgment order; therefore this was removed as a factor in the data analysis. Table 3 contains the threshold means and standard deviations for discrimination, and Fig. 4 displays the threshold profiles for each face type.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Yet it does not interfere with the ability to make precise estimates of facial feature distances.The results clearly showed that geometrical face discrimination is not subject to the traditional face inversion effect and did not show a benefit for natural faces.Based on these counterintuitive results, we suggest that participants used analytical processing to do the discrimination task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, 6207 Moore Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. pamela.m.pallett@dartmouth.edu

ABSTRACT
Inversion dramatically impairs face perception, recognition, and discrimination. Yet it does not interfere with the ability to make precise estimates of facial feature distances. To investigate this discontinuity between facial feature distance estimation and general perception and recognition, we assessed the effect of inversion on the discrimination of differences in facial compression and elongation or expansion using geometrically distorted faces. The results clearly showed that geometrical face discrimination is not subject to the traditional face inversion effect and did not show a benefit for natural faces. Although discrimination thresholds were not affected by inversion, response times to the distance judgments were faster with inversion, especially when the inverted faces contained natural configurations. Based on these counterintuitive results, we suggest that participants used analytical processing to do the discrimination task. Moreover, we suggest that the depth with which a face is holistically encoded depends on the nature of the task, face orientation, and similarity between a face and the prototypical face template.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus