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Cephalometric comparison of pharyngeal airway in snoring and non-snoring patients.

Kurt G, Sisman C, Akin E, Akcam T - Eur J Dent (2011)

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were found between the three groups in skeletal measurements.The OSA group showed significantly increased soft palate angulation when compared with the control group (P<.05).The decreased airway dimension in the soft palate area due to increased soft palate volume must be taken into consideration in treatment planning of OSA patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Erciyes University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Kayseri, Turkey. gokmenkurt@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To compare the skeletal and the airway structures of the non-snoring individuals with simple snoring and patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Methods: The first group consisted of 20 simple snoring cases (mean age: 37.5±8.05 years; max: 50 years, min: 21 years), the second group consisted of 20 OSA cases (mean age: 40.0±8.28 years; max: 54 years, min: 27 years) and the third group consisted of 20 individuals without any respiration problems (mean age: 29.6±3.20 years; max: 35 years, min: 24 years). In the cephalometric films, 4 skeletal and 14 airway space measurements were done. The control group and the study groups were compared using the Dunnett t test, and the groups with snoring problems were compared using the Bonferroni test.

Results: No statistically significant differences were found between the three groups in skeletal measurements. The OSA and simple snoring groups showed no significant differences in airway measurements. The OSA group showed significantly increased soft palate angulation when compared with the control group (P<.05). Soft palate length, soft palate thickness and soft palate height were significantly higher in the OSA samples than in the control group (P<.001). Pharyngeal spaces in the soft palate area had the significantly lowest values in the OSA group. Inferior pharyngeal space distances in the control group were greater than in both study groups. The OSA group showed the most inferiorly positioned hyoid bone and the difference between OSA and control groups was significant (P<.01).

Conclusions: The decreased airway dimension in the soft palate area due to increased soft palate volume must be taken into consideration in treatment planning of OSA patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Skeletal measurements; SNAº, SNBº, ANBº and SN/GoGnº.
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f1-dent05_p0084: Skeletal measurements; SNAº, SNBº, ANBº and SN/GoGnº.

Mentions: Four skeletal (SNA, SNB, ANB and SN/GoGn) (Figure 1) and 14 airway space measurements (ANS.PNS.SPT, PNS-SPT, SPC-SPD, SPT-SPpp, PNS-PPW1, SPT-PPW2, SPL/SPS, SPL/IPS, Psp-Phws, Sbtn-Phwn, Sbti-Phwl, Pns-Eb, Eb-Tt and Ml-Hy) (Figure 2) were done on the cephalometric films.


Cephalometric comparison of pharyngeal airway in snoring and non-snoring patients.

Kurt G, Sisman C, Akin E, Akcam T - Eur J Dent (2011)

Skeletal measurements; SNAº, SNBº, ANBº and SN/GoGnº.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3037194&req=5

f1-dent05_p0084: Skeletal measurements; SNAº, SNBº, ANBº and SN/GoGnº.
Mentions: Four skeletal (SNA, SNB, ANB and SN/GoGn) (Figure 1) and 14 airway space measurements (ANS.PNS.SPT, PNS-SPT, SPC-SPD, SPT-SPpp, PNS-PPW1, SPT-PPW2, SPL/SPS, SPL/IPS, Psp-Phws, Sbtn-Phwn, Sbti-Phwl, Pns-Eb, Eb-Tt and Ml-Hy) (Figure 2) were done on the cephalometric films.

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were found between the three groups in skeletal measurements.The OSA group showed significantly increased soft palate angulation when compared with the control group (P<.05).The decreased airway dimension in the soft palate area due to increased soft palate volume must be taken into consideration in treatment planning of OSA patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Erciyes University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Kayseri, Turkey. gokmenkurt@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To compare the skeletal and the airway structures of the non-snoring individuals with simple snoring and patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Methods: The first group consisted of 20 simple snoring cases (mean age: 37.5±8.05 years; max: 50 years, min: 21 years), the second group consisted of 20 OSA cases (mean age: 40.0±8.28 years; max: 54 years, min: 27 years) and the third group consisted of 20 individuals without any respiration problems (mean age: 29.6±3.20 years; max: 35 years, min: 24 years). In the cephalometric films, 4 skeletal and 14 airway space measurements were done. The control group and the study groups were compared using the Dunnett t test, and the groups with snoring problems were compared using the Bonferroni test.

Results: No statistically significant differences were found between the three groups in skeletal measurements. The OSA and simple snoring groups showed no significant differences in airway measurements. The OSA group showed significantly increased soft palate angulation when compared with the control group (P<.05). Soft palate length, soft palate thickness and soft palate height were significantly higher in the OSA samples than in the control group (P<.001). Pharyngeal spaces in the soft palate area had the significantly lowest values in the OSA group. Inferior pharyngeal space distances in the control group were greater than in both study groups. The OSA group showed the most inferiorly positioned hyoid bone and the difference between OSA and control groups was significant (P<.01).

Conclusions: The decreased airway dimension in the soft palate area due to increased soft palate volume must be taken into consideration in treatment planning of OSA patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus