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Association between nasal shedding and fever that influenza A (H3N2) induces in dogs.

Song D, Moon H, Jung K, Yeom M, Kim H, Han S, An D, Oh J, Kim J, Park B, Kang B - Virol. J. (2011)

Bottom Line: Clinical signs including fever were recorded for 14 days post inoculation.The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID₅₀/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever.The data show that contact dogs with a canine influenza infected dog shed different levels of virus in their nasal excretions and demonstrate that clinical signs, including fever, significantly correlate with the viral shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Viral Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejon 305-806, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Avian origin canine influenza virus was reported in Korea. The dog to dog contact transmission of the avian origin canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N2 and CIV H3N8 was shown by experimental contact transmission. This study was focused on viral excretion and fever in order to elucidate the epidemiological associations which might be helpful to control the disease transmissions in CIV outbreak in dogs.

Methods: An influenza seronegative 10-week-old Beagle dog was experimentally inoculated with the canine influenza virus A/canine/01/2007, subtype H3N2. Eight hours after inoculation, the infected dog was cohoused with seven uninfected Beagle dogs. Clinical signs including fever were recorded for 14 days post inoculation.

Results: The infected dog and four of seven contact dogs in the study showed clinical signs (sneezing, nasal discharge and coughing) during the study. Viral shedding occurred in all of the animals tested and began on 1 to 6 DPI in dogs with clinical signs. Elevated body temperatures above 39.5 °C (geometric mean temperature of 39.86 °C ± 0.49) were observed in all symptomatic dogs. The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID₅₀/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever.

Conclusions: The data show that contact dogs with a canine influenza infected dog shed different levels of virus in their nasal excretions and demonstrate that clinical signs, including fever, significantly correlate with the viral shedding.

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Comparison of the mean viral titer during fever (>39.5°C) and non-fever stages (<39.5°C). The mean viral titer in the presence and absence of fever was 2.99 and 0.78 log EID50/ml, respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (p << 0.001, Student's T test.).
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Figure 2: Comparison of the mean viral titer during fever (>39.5°C) and non-fever stages (<39.5°C). The mean viral titer in the presence and absence of fever was 2.99 and 0.78 log EID50/ml, respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (p << 0.001, Student's T test.).

Mentions: Body temperature (°C) was also monitored during the study, and increases in body temperature correlated with the level of viral shedding as well. Elevated body temperatures above 39.5°C (39.86°C ± 0.49) were observed in all symptomatic dogs, while the body temperatures of all dogs without clinical signs remained below 39.5°C (38.68°C ± 0.41). The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID50/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever (0.78 log EID50/ml; p << 0.001, Student's T-test) (Figure 2).


Association between nasal shedding and fever that influenza A (H3N2) induces in dogs.

Song D, Moon H, Jung K, Yeom M, Kim H, Han S, An D, Oh J, Kim J, Park B, Kang B - Virol. J. (2011)

Comparison of the mean viral titer during fever (>39.5°C) and non-fever stages (<39.5°C). The mean viral titer in the presence and absence of fever was 2.99 and 0.78 log EID50/ml, respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (p << 0.001, Student's T test.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3025961&req=5

Figure 2: Comparison of the mean viral titer during fever (>39.5°C) and non-fever stages (<39.5°C). The mean viral titer in the presence and absence of fever was 2.99 and 0.78 log EID50/ml, respectively, and this difference was statistically significant (p << 0.001, Student's T test.).
Mentions: Body temperature (°C) was also monitored during the study, and increases in body temperature correlated with the level of viral shedding as well. Elevated body temperatures above 39.5°C (39.86°C ± 0.49) were observed in all symptomatic dogs, while the body temperatures of all dogs without clinical signs remained below 39.5°C (38.68°C ± 0.41). The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID50/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever (0.78 log EID50/ml; p << 0.001, Student's T-test) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Clinical signs including fever were recorded for 14 days post inoculation.The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID₅₀/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever.The data show that contact dogs with a canine influenza infected dog shed different levels of virus in their nasal excretions and demonstrate that clinical signs, including fever, significantly correlate with the viral shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Viral Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejon 305-806, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Avian origin canine influenza virus was reported in Korea. The dog to dog contact transmission of the avian origin canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N2 and CIV H3N8 was shown by experimental contact transmission. This study was focused on viral excretion and fever in order to elucidate the epidemiological associations which might be helpful to control the disease transmissions in CIV outbreak in dogs.

Methods: An influenza seronegative 10-week-old Beagle dog was experimentally inoculated with the canine influenza virus A/canine/01/2007, subtype H3N2. Eight hours after inoculation, the infected dog was cohoused with seven uninfected Beagle dogs. Clinical signs including fever were recorded for 14 days post inoculation.

Results: The infected dog and four of seven contact dogs in the study showed clinical signs (sneezing, nasal discharge and coughing) during the study. Viral shedding occurred in all of the animals tested and began on 1 to 6 DPI in dogs with clinical signs. Elevated body temperatures above 39.5 °C (geometric mean temperature of 39.86 °C ± 0.49) were observed in all symptomatic dogs. The mean viral titer during fever was 2.99 log EID₅₀/ml, which was significantly higher than the viral titer detected in the non fever.

Conclusions: The data show that contact dogs with a canine influenza infected dog shed different levels of virus in their nasal excretions and demonstrate that clinical signs, including fever, significantly correlate with the viral shedding.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus