Limits...
Genetic and phenotypic variation of the malaria vector Anopheles atroparvus in southern Europe.

Vicente JL, Sousa CA, Alten B, Caglar SS, Falcutá E, Latorre JM, Toty C, Barré H, Demirci B, Di Luca M, Toma L, Alves R, Salgueiro P, Silva TL, Bargues MD, Mas-Coma S, Boccolini D, Romi R, Nicolescu G, do Rosário VE, Ozer N, Fontenille D, Pinto J - Malar. J. (2011)

Bottom Line: Differentiation between sibling species was not so evident at the phenotype level.Levels of population differentiation within An. atroparvus were low and not correlated with geographic distance or with putative physical barriers to gene flow (Alps and Pyrenées).While these results may suggest considerable levels of gene flow, other explanations such as the effect of historical population perturbations can also be hypothesized.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais/UEI Malária, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira 100, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a growing concern that global climate change will affect the potential for pathogen transmission by insect species that are vectors of human diseases. One of these species is the former European malaria vector, Anopheles atroparvus. Levels of population differentiation of An. atroparvus from southern Europe were characterized as a first attempt to elucidate patterns of population structure of this former malaria vector. Results are discussed in light of a hypothetical situation of re-establishment of malaria transmission.

Methods: Genetic and phenotypic variation was analysed in nine mosquito samples collected from five European countries, using eight microsatellite loci and geometric morphometrics on 21 wing landmarks.

Results: Levels of genetic diversity were comparable to those reported for tropical malaria vectors. Low levels of genetic (0.004

Conclusions: Levels of population differentiation within An. atroparvus were low and not correlated with geographic distance or with putative physical barriers to gene flow (Alps and Pyrenées). While these results may suggest considerable levels of gene flow, other explanations such as the effect of historical population perturbations can also be hypothesized.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Two-dimensional plot of a Factorial Correspondence Analysis based on allele differences at 8 microsatellites. Horizontal axis: FC1 (60.4%); vertical axis: FC2 (11.5%) White squares: An. atroparvus; grey squares: Anopheles atroparvus from Romania; black squares: An. maculipennis s.s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3025906&req=5

Figure 3: Two-dimensional plot of a Factorial Correspondence Analysis based on allele differences at 8 microsatellites. Horizontal axis: FC1 (60.4%); vertical axis: FC2 (11.5%) White squares: An. atroparvus; grey squares: Anopheles atroparvus from Romania; black squares: An. maculipennis s.s.

Mentions: Comparisons involving An. maculipennis s.s. were all significant and gave FST estimates above 0.200, i.e. more than two-fold greater than those among An. atroparvus samples. This differentiation was evident in the FCA (Figure 3) where An. maculipennis s.s. individuals form a cluster clearly separated from An. atroparvus. For the later species there was a nearly complete overlapping between samples, with the exception of the sample from Romania. Individuals from this sample tended to group together in a cluster that only partially overlapped with the remaining An. atroparvus samples.


Genetic and phenotypic variation of the malaria vector Anopheles atroparvus in southern Europe.

Vicente JL, Sousa CA, Alten B, Caglar SS, Falcutá E, Latorre JM, Toty C, Barré H, Demirci B, Di Luca M, Toma L, Alves R, Salgueiro P, Silva TL, Bargues MD, Mas-Coma S, Boccolini D, Romi R, Nicolescu G, do Rosário VE, Ozer N, Fontenille D, Pinto J - Malar. J. (2011)

Two-dimensional plot of a Factorial Correspondence Analysis based on allele differences at 8 microsatellites. Horizontal axis: FC1 (60.4%); vertical axis: FC2 (11.5%) White squares: An. atroparvus; grey squares: Anopheles atroparvus from Romania; black squares: An. maculipennis s.s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3025906&req=5

Figure 3: Two-dimensional plot of a Factorial Correspondence Analysis based on allele differences at 8 microsatellites. Horizontal axis: FC1 (60.4%); vertical axis: FC2 (11.5%) White squares: An. atroparvus; grey squares: Anopheles atroparvus from Romania; black squares: An. maculipennis s.s.
Mentions: Comparisons involving An. maculipennis s.s. were all significant and gave FST estimates above 0.200, i.e. more than two-fold greater than those among An. atroparvus samples. This differentiation was evident in the FCA (Figure 3) where An. maculipennis s.s. individuals form a cluster clearly separated from An. atroparvus. For the later species there was a nearly complete overlapping between samples, with the exception of the sample from Romania. Individuals from this sample tended to group together in a cluster that only partially overlapped with the remaining An. atroparvus samples.

Bottom Line: Differentiation between sibling species was not so evident at the phenotype level.Levels of population differentiation within An. atroparvus were low and not correlated with geographic distance or with putative physical barriers to gene flow (Alps and Pyrenées).While these results may suggest considerable levels of gene flow, other explanations such as the effect of historical population perturbations can also be hypothesized.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais/UEI Malária, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira 100, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a growing concern that global climate change will affect the potential for pathogen transmission by insect species that are vectors of human diseases. One of these species is the former European malaria vector, Anopheles atroparvus. Levels of population differentiation of An. atroparvus from southern Europe were characterized as a first attempt to elucidate patterns of population structure of this former malaria vector. Results are discussed in light of a hypothetical situation of re-establishment of malaria transmission.

Methods: Genetic and phenotypic variation was analysed in nine mosquito samples collected from five European countries, using eight microsatellite loci and geometric morphometrics on 21 wing landmarks.

Results: Levels of genetic diversity were comparable to those reported for tropical malaria vectors. Low levels of genetic (0.004

Conclusions: Levels of population differentiation within An. atroparvus were low and not correlated with geographic distance or with putative physical barriers to gene flow (Alps and Pyrenées). While these results may suggest considerable levels of gene flow, other explanations such as the effect of historical population perturbations can also be hypothesized.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus