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Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging.

Terao J, Minami Y, Bando N - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O(2) ((1)Δ(g))].Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin.These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O(2) ((1)Δ(g))]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) quencher.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed relationship between dietary β-carotene and peroxidation of cholesterol in ultraviolet-A (UVA)-induced skin photoaging.1O2: O2 (1Δg), Chol 5α-OOH: Cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, Chol 7α/β-OOH: 7α/β-hydroperoxide, MMP: matrix metalloproteinase.
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Figure 5: Proposed relationship between dietary β-carotene and peroxidation of cholesterol in ultraviolet-A (UVA)-induced skin photoaging.1O2: O2 (1Δg), Chol 5α-OOH: Cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, Chol 7α/β-OOH: 7α/β-hydroperoxide, MMP: matrix metalloproteinase.

Mentions: Carotenoids have long been known to be the most effective O2 (1Δg) quenchers and that they readily accumulate in human skin due to the intake of carotenoid-rich foods and supplements. The results of animal model experiments indicate the accumulation of cholesterol hydroperoxides in the skin are accelerated by UVA irradiation and that these peroxidized skin lipids mediate the enhancement of MMP expression, resulting in the formation of skin wrinkles and sagging. Dietary carotenoids can suppress MMP expression (at least in part) by attenuating the accumulation of peroxidized skin lipids, including cholesterol hydroperoxides (Fig. 5). In this context, the antioxidant activity of dietary carotenoids principally targets the skin. Carotenoids play a major part in the quenching of O2 (1Δg) generated by UVA-dependent photodynamic action among a wide variety of dietary antioxidants. The intake of carotenoid-rich foods and supplements therefore appear to be helpful for protecting the skin from photoaging.


Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging.

Terao J, Minami Y, Bando N - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Proposed relationship between dietary β-carotene and peroxidation of cholesterol in ultraviolet-A (UVA)-induced skin photoaging.1O2: O2 (1Δg), Chol 5α-OOH: Cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, Chol 7α/β-OOH: 7α/β-hydroperoxide, MMP: matrix metalloproteinase.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3022065&req=5

Figure 5: Proposed relationship between dietary β-carotene and peroxidation of cholesterol in ultraviolet-A (UVA)-induced skin photoaging.1O2: O2 (1Δg), Chol 5α-OOH: Cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, Chol 7α/β-OOH: 7α/β-hydroperoxide, MMP: matrix metalloproteinase.
Mentions: Carotenoids have long been known to be the most effective O2 (1Δg) quenchers and that they readily accumulate in human skin due to the intake of carotenoid-rich foods and supplements. The results of animal model experiments indicate the accumulation of cholesterol hydroperoxides in the skin are accelerated by UVA irradiation and that these peroxidized skin lipids mediate the enhancement of MMP expression, resulting in the formation of skin wrinkles and sagging. Dietary carotenoids can suppress MMP expression (at least in part) by attenuating the accumulation of peroxidized skin lipids, including cholesterol hydroperoxides (Fig. 5). In this context, the antioxidant activity of dietary carotenoids principally targets the skin. Carotenoids play a major part in the quenching of O2 (1Δg) generated by UVA-dependent photodynamic action among a wide variety of dietary antioxidants. The intake of carotenoid-rich foods and supplements therefore appear to be helpful for protecting the skin from photoaging.

Bottom Line: Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O(2) ((1)Δ(g))].Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin.These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O(2) ((1)Δ(g))]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O(2) ((1)Δ(g)) quencher.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus