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Progression of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction.

Kim MN, Park SM, Kim SW, Lee KN, Kim JS, Kang EJ, Ahn CM, Shim WJ - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2010)

Bottom Line: Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysms rarely occur, but are detected more often with the development of new diagnostic tools.Since LV pseudoaneurysms are life-threatening, early surgical intervention is recommended.This report describes an 87-year-old woman with heart failure and a large LV pseudoaneurysm which progressed from a small LV pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction over a 1-year period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysms rarely occur, but are detected more often with the development of new diagnostic tools. Since LV pseudoaneurysms are life-threatening, early surgical intervention is recommended. This report describes an 87-year-old woman with heart failure and a large LV pseudoaneurysm which progressed from a small LV pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction over a 1-year period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during the previous admission shows a focal, bulging, sac-like lesion (arrow) without a definite peripheral wall in the lateral wall at the mid-LV level. LV: left ventricle.
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Figure 3: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during the previous admission shows a focal, bulging, sac-like lesion (arrow) without a definite peripheral wall in the lateral wall at the mid-LV level. LV: left ventricle.

Mentions: Two-dimensional echocardiography at the previous admission showed decreased LV systolic function (ejection fraction, 40%) and a mild pericardial effusion. The regional wall motion abnormalities with akinetic basal to the mid-inferior and posterolateral walls of the LV were observed. In a color Doppler study, mild mitral regurgitation was noted in systole. The continuity of the myocardium of the mid-posterior wall was disrupted and a small sac (22 × 11 mm) with a narrow neck was seen which was suspected to be a rupture of the free wall with a thrombotic plug (Fig. 2A). A LV pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed and contrast echocardiography was performed to evaluate further blood leakage through the ruptured myocardium and sac. Contrast echocardiography revealed that the pseudoaneurysm on the LV posterior wall was clearly defined and did not communicate with the pericardial space (Fig. 2B). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed a small bulging sac-like lesion with a neck portion in the mid-posterior wall of the LV without definite myocardial tissue (Fig. 3).


Progression of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction.

Kim MN, Park SM, Kim SW, Lee KN, Kim JS, Kang EJ, Ahn CM, Shim WJ - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2010)

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during the previous admission shows a focal, bulging, sac-like lesion (arrow) without a definite peripheral wall in the lateral wall at the mid-LV level. LV: left ventricle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021898&req=5

Figure 3: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during the previous admission shows a focal, bulging, sac-like lesion (arrow) without a definite peripheral wall in the lateral wall at the mid-LV level. LV: left ventricle.
Mentions: Two-dimensional echocardiography at the previous admission showed decreased LV systolic function (ejection fraction, 40%) and a mild pericardial effusion. The regional wall motion abnormalities with akinetic basal to the mid-inferior and posterolateral walls of the LV were observed. In a color Doppler study, mild mitral regurgitation was noted in systole. The continuity of the myocardium of the mid-posterior wall was disrupted and a small sac (22 × 11 mm) with a narrow neck was seen which was suspected to be a rupture of the free wall with a thrombotic plug (Fig. 2A). A LV pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed and contrast echocardiography was performed to evaluate further blood leakage through the ruptured myocardium and sac. Contrast echocardiography revealed that the pseudoaneurysm on the LV posterior wall was clearly defined and did not communicate with the pericardial space (Fig. 2B). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed a small bulging sac-like lesion with a neck portion in the mid-posterior wall of the LV without definite myocardial tissue (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysms rarely occur, but are detected more often with the development of new diagnostic tools.Since LV pseudoaneurysms are life-threatening, early surgical intervention is recommended.This report describes an 87-year-old woman with heart failure and a large LV pseudoaneurysm which progressed from a small LV pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction over a 1-year period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysms rarely occur, but are detected more often with the development of new diagnostic tools. Since LV pseudoaneurysms are life-threatening, early surgical intervention is recommended. This report describes an 87-year-old woman with heart failure and a large LV pseudoaneurysm which progressed from a small LV pseudoaneurysm after an acute myocardial infarction over a 1-year period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus