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What is the 'objective' differential factor of diarrhea in infancy?: Normal state versus diarrheal illness in infants with chronic frequent and loose stool.

Hwang JB, Kang KJ, Lee JJ, Kim AS - Korean J Pediatr (2010)

Bottom Line: Data were analyzed from infants under 2 years of age with CFLS who had been transferred from general pediatricians.A failure to gain weight was observed in 39% of even NFLS.NFLS was more common than DIDN in infants with CFLS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to identify 'objective' differential factors for normal frequent loose stool (NFLS) and diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN) among infants with chronic frequent loose stool (CFLS).

Methods: Data were analyzed from infants under 2 years of age with CFLS who had been transferred from general pediatricians. These 46 patients were divided into 2 groups (NFLS versus DIDN). Nocturnal stool was defined as evacuation between 10 pm and 6 am. Maximal stool amount/day (measured using the mother's hand) was specified as the highest score during the period of CFLS obtained by adding up each evacuation's score (range, 0-2 points).

Results: There were 36 cases of NFLS and 10 of DIDN. A failure to gain weight (P=0.0001), fever (P=0.0079), colic/abdominal pain (P=0.0014), gross blood in stool (except allergic proctocolitis) (P=0.0113), nocturnal stool (P=0.0001), and the score of stool amount (P=0.0001) were found to significantly differentiate the groups. A failure to gain weight was observed in 39% of even NFLS. The frequency, mucus content, and microbiological findings of stools, as well as diaper dermatitis were not found to significantly differentiate the groups.

Conclusion: NFLS was more common than DIDN in infants with CFLS. The most 'objective' differential factors were nocturnal stool and the score of stool amount (≥7 points/day).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The scores of stool amount for normal controls, patients with normal frequent loose stool (NFLS), and patients with diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN).
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Figure 2: The scores of stool amount for normal controls, patients with normal frequent loose stool (NFLS), and patients with diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN).

Mentions: Maximal scores of stool amount were 3.3 (2-6) points in the NFLS group and 8.3 (7-12) points in the DIDN group, significantly different in the two study groups (P<0.001). In 95 normal controls (aged between 7 days and 2 years old), 2.0 (0-6) points were observed, and this score was significantly different with the score of DIDN patients (P<0.001), but not with NFLS patients. Both the normal controls and NFLS group were scored less than 7 points/day, but all cases in the DIDN were scored over 7 points/day (Table 1, Fig. 2).


What is the 'objective' differential factor of diarrhea in infancy?: Normal state versus diarrheal illness in infants with chronic frequent and loose stool.

Hwang JB, Kang KJ, Lee JJ, Kim AS - Korean J Pediatr (2010)

The scores of stool amount for normal controls, patients with normal frequent loose stool (NFLS), and patients with diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021726&req=5

Figure 2: The scores of stool amount for normal controls, patients with normal frequent loose stool (NFLS), and patients with diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN).
Mentions: Maximal scores of stool amount were 3.3 (2-6) points in the NFLS group and 8.3 (7-12) points in the DIDN group, significantly different in the two study groups (P<0.001). In 95 normal controls (aged between 7 days and 2 years old), 2.0 (0-6) points were observed, and this score was significantly different with the score of DIDN patients (P<0.001), but not with NFLS patients. Both the normal controls and NFLS group were scored less than 7 points/day, but all cases in the DIDN were scored over 7 points/day (Table 1, Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Data were analyzed from infants under 2 years of age with CFLS who had been transferred from general pediatricians.A failure to gain weight was observed in 39% of even NFLS.NFLS was more common than DIDN in infants with CFLS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to identify 'objective' differential factors for normal frequent loose stool (NFLS) and diarrheal illness with dehydration and nutritional deficiency (DIDN) among infants with chronic frequent loose stool (CFLS).

Methods: Data were analyzed from infants under 2 years of age with CFLS who had been transferred from general pediatricians. These 46 patients were divided into 2 groups (NFLS versus DIDN). Nocturnal stool was defined as evacuation between 10 pm and 6 am. Maximal stool amount/day (measured using the mother's hand) was specified as the highest score during the period of CFLS obtained by adding up each evacuation's score (range, 0-2 points).

Results: There were 36 cases of NFLS and 10 of DIDN. A failure to gain weight (P=0.0001), fever (P=0.0079), colic/abdominal pain (P=0.0014), gross blood in stool (except allergic proctocolitis) (P=0.0113), nocturnal stool (P=0.0001), and the score of stool amount (P=0.0001) were found to significantly differentiate the groups. A failure to gain weight was observed in 39% of even NFLS. The frequency, mucus content, and microbiological findings of stools, as well as diaper dermatitis were not found to significantly differentiate the groups.

Conclusion: NFLS was more common than DIDN in infants with CFLS. The most 'objective' differential factors were nocturnal stool and the score of stool amount (≥7 points/day).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus