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The effect of preincisional periportal infiltration with ropivacaine in pain relief after laparoscopic procedures: a prospective, randomized controlled trial.

Pavlidis TE, Atmatzidis KS, Papaziogas BT, Makris JG, Lazaridis CN, Papaziogas TB - JSLS (2003 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: This study examined the effect of wound infiltration by a long-acting local anesthetic.The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).It seems that wound infiltration with ropivacaine in laparoscopy provides satisfactory postoperative analgesia, diminishing or reducing the need for opioids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Surgical Department of Medical Faculty of the Aristotles University of Thessaloniki, G. Gennimatas Hospital, Greece. pavlidth@med.auth.gr

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: It is essential to minimize pain after laparoscopic surgery. This study examined the effect of wound infiltration by a long-acting local anesthetic.

Methods: This prospective, randomized study includes 190 laparoscopic procedures carried out by the same surgeon. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups. The control group comprised 75 cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and 20 cases of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR) without the use of a local anesthetic; only saline was used. The study group comprised 75 cases of LC and 20 cases of LIHR with preincisional periportal infiltration with 20 mL of ropivacaine (10 mg/mL). The postoperative pain scores at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours determined with a visual analogue scale (VAS), nausea, and the kind and amount of analgesic drugs were assessed.

Results: In the study group in 41% of LC cases and 85% of LIHR cases, no analgesia was required at all; likewise, in the control group in 20% of LC cases and 44% of LIHR cases, no analgesia was required. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). In the remainder, pain at 3 and 6 hours and total analgesic requirements in the study group were less than that in the control group (P<0.05). The postoperative nausea and shoulder pain remained statistically unchanged (P>0.05).

Conclusions: It seems that wound infiltration with ropivacaine in laparoscopy provides satisfactory postoperative analgesia, diminishing or reducing the need for opioids.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores in the patients of the study group and control group after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC).
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Figure 1: Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores in the patients of the study group and control group after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC).

Mentions: Postoperative analgesia was not required in the study group in 31 patients after LC (41%) and in 12 patients after LIHR (85%); in the control group in 15 patients after LC (20%) and in 7 patients after LIHR (44%). The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The VAS scores in the study group were significantly lower than those in the control group at the 3rd and 6th hours (P<0.01), whereas they did not differ significantly at the 12th and 24th hours (P>0.05) (Figures 1 and 2).


The effect of preincisional periportal infiltration with ropivacaine in pain relief after laparoscopic procedures: a prospective, randomized controlled trial.

Pavlidis TE, Atmatzidis KS, Papaziogas BT, Makris JG, Lazaridis CN, Papaziogas TB - JSLS (2003 Oct-Dec)

Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores in the patients of the study group and control group after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021348&req=5

Figure 1: Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores in the patients of the study group and control group after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC).
Mentions: Postoperative analgesia was not required in the study group in 31 patients after LC (41%) and in 12 patients after LIHR (85%); in the control group in 15 patients after LC (20%) and in 7 patients after LIHR (44%). The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The VAS scores in the study group were significantly lower than those in the control group at the 3rd and 6th hours (P<0.01), whereas they did not differ significantly at the 12th and 24th hours (P>0.05) (Figures 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: This study examined the effect of wound infiltration by a long-acting local anesthetic.The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).It seems that wound infiltration with ropivacaine in laparoscopy provides satisfactory postoperative analgesia, diminishing or reducing the need for opioids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Surgical Department of Medical Faculty of the Aristotles University of Thessaloniki, G. Gennimatas Hospital, Greece. pavlidth@med.auth.gr

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: It is essential to minimize pain after laparoscopic surgery. This study examined the effect of wound infiltration by a long-acting local anesthetic.

Methods: This prospective, randomized study includes 190 laparoscopic procedures carried out by the same surgeon. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups. The control group comprised 75 cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and 20 cases of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR) without the use of a local anesthetic; only saline was used. The study group comprised 75 cases of LC and 20 cases of LIHR with preincisional periportal infiltration with 20 mL of ropivacaine (10 mg/mL). The postoperative pain scores at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours determined with a visual analogue scale (VAS), nausea, and the kind and amount of analgesic drugs were assessed.

Results: In the study group in 41% of LC cases and 85% of LIHR cases, no analgesia was required at all; likewise, in the control group in 20% of LC cases and 44% of LIHR cases, no analgesia was required. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). In the remainder, pain at 3 and 6 hours and total analgesic requirements in the study group were less than that in the control group (P<0.05). The postoperative nausea and shoulder pain remained statistically unchanged (P>0.05).

Conclusions: It seems that wound infiltration with ropivacaine in laparoscopy provides satisfactory postoperative analgesia, diminishing or reducing the need for opioids.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus