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Improvements in 25 Years of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy.

van Welsenes GH, Borleffs CJ, van Rees JB, Atary JZ, Thijssen J, van der Wall EE, Schalij MJ - Neth Heart J (2010)

Bottom Line: In 1980, Dr. Michel Mirowski and his team inserted the first implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a patient.Initially, ICD therapy was not widely accepted, and many physicians actually considered this therapy unethical.Furthermore, with the more recent addition of resynchronisation therapy to standard ICD therapy, it became possible to treat selected patients with advanced symptoms of heart failure and to lower the risk of sudden death.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, C5-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In 1980, Dr. Michel Mirowski and his team inserted the first implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a patient. Initially, ICD therapy was not widely accepted, and many physicians actually considered this therapy unethical. Large secondary and primary prevention trials, demonstrating a beneficial effect of ICD therapy in selected patients not only on arrhythmic death but also on all-cause mortality, stimulated a rapid growth in the number of implants and increased patient's and physician's acceptance. Improvements in size and weight, arrhythmia discrimination capabilities, battery technology, shock waveform and output, monitoring capabilities and defibrillator electrode technology eventually resulted in the current large number of yearly implants. Today, almost 40 years after the conception of the ICD and 25 years after the first human implant, ICD therapy is the treatment of choice for patients at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias either as secondary or primary prevention. Furthermore, with the more recent addition of resynchronisation therapy to standard ICD therapy, it became possible to treat selected patients with advanced symptoms of heart failure and to lower the risk of sudden death.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of pectoral implanted CRT-D system in a 42-year-old male. CRT-D cardiac resynchronisation therapy—defibrillator
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Fig2: Example of pectoral implanted CRT-D system in a 42-year-old male. CRT-D cardiac resynchronisation therapy—defibrillator

Mentions: The first ICD was large and heavy, could not be programmed, used epicardial patch electrodes and required a thoracotomy for the implantation of the epicardial lead system. ICD implantation procedures were major surgical interventions, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, since then, many improvements have been made. Current devices are relatively small, can be implanted subcutaneously in the majority of cases and are connected to an endocardial lead system (Figs. 1 and 2).Fig. 1


Improvements in 25 Years of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy.

van Welsenes GH, Borleffs CJ, van Rees JB, Atary JZ, Thijssen J, van der Wall EE, Schalij MJ - Neth Heart J (2010)

Example of pectoral implanted CRT-D system in a 42-year-old male. CRT-D cardiac resynchronisation therapy—defibrillator
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021193&req=5

Fig2: Example of pectoral implanted CRT-D system in a 42-year-old male. CRT-D cardiac resynchronisation therapy—defibrillator
Mentions: The first ICD was large and heavy, could not be programmed, used epicardial patch electrodes and required a thoracotomy for the implantation of the epicardial lead system. ICD implantation procedures were major surgical interventions, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, since then, many improvements have been made. Current devices are relatively small, can be implanted subcutaneously in the majority of cases and are connected to an endocardial lead system (Figs. 1 and 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In 1980, Dr. Michel Mirowski and his team inserted the first implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a patient.Initially, ICD therapy was not widely accepted, and many physicians actually considered this therapy unethical.Furthermore, with the more recent addition of resynchronisation therapy to standard ICD therapy, it became possible to treat selected patients with advanced symptoms of heart failure and to lower the risk of sudden death.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, C5-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In 1980, Dr. Michel Mirowski and his team inserted the first implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in a patient. Initially, ICD therapy was not widely accepted, and many physicians actually considered this therapy unethical. Large secondary and primary prevention trials, demonstrating a beneficial effect of ICD therapy in selected patients not only on arrhythmic death but also on all-cause mortality, stimulated a rapid growth in the number of implants and increased patient's and physician's acceptance. Improvements in size and weight, arrhythmia discrimination capabilities, battery technology, shock waveform and output, monitoring capabilities and defibrillator electrode technology eventually resulted in the current large number of yearly implants. Today, almost 40 years after the conception of the ICD and 25 years after the first human implant, ICD therapy is the treatment of choice for patients at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias either as secondary or primary prevention. Furthermore, with the more recent addition of resynchronisation therapy to standard ICD therapy, it became possible to treat selected patients with advanced symptoms of heart failure and to lower the risk of sudden death.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus