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Incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation: A case report on radiological findings by computerized tomography at follow-up.

Lee KS, Kwon YH, Herr Y, Shin SI, Lee JY, Chung JH - J Periodontal Implant Sci (2010)

Bottom Line: The result of this case suggests that patients who received maxillary sinus augmentation may experience incomplete bone formation.It is possible that 1) osteoconductive graft material with poor osteogenic potential, 2) overpacking of graft material that restricts the blood supply, and 3) bone microbial contamination may cause the appearance of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation.Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of this unexpected result and care must be taken to prevent it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Kyung Hee University School of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this case report is to present a case of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation.

Methods: A patient having alveolar bone resorption of the maxillary posterior edentulous region and advanced pneumatization of the maxillary sinus was treated with sinus elevation using deproteinized bovine bone in the Department of Periodontology, Kyung Hee University School of Dentistry and re-evaluated with computed tomography (CT) follow-up.

Results: Even though there were no significant findings or abnormal radiolucency on the panoramic radiograph, incomplete bone formation in the central portion of the augmented sinus was found fortuitously in the CT scan. The CT scan revealed peri-implant radiolucency in the apical portion of the implant placed in the augmented maxillary sinus. Nevertheless, the dental implants placed in the grafted sinus still functioned well at over 15 months follow-up.

Conclusions: The result of this case suggests that patients who received maxillary sinus augmentation may experience incomplete bone formation. It is possible that 1) osteoconductive graft material with poor osteogenic potential, 2) overpacking of graft material that restricts the blood supply, and 3) bone microbial contamination may cause the appearance of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of this unexpected result and care must be taken to prevent it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bone cavity in #16i and 17i area was found in the computed tomography scan (32 months after the sinus augmentation).
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Figure 9: Bone cavity in #16i and 17i area was found in the computed tomography scan (32 months after the sinus augmentation).

Mentions: The implants placed in the augmented sinus were clinically healthy and the implant-supported restorations had been functioning successfully at 17 months after initial loading. Unexpectedly, the patient visited the dental clinic with the chief complaints of pain on biting in the upper right 2nd premolar (#15) since he had eaten hard food 3 days earlier. The #15 tooth was diagnosed as cracked and endodontic therapy was required. During endodontic therapy, a CT scan was taken to locate the buccal canal of the tooth. Peri-implant radiolucency in the apical portion of the implant placed in the augmented maxillary sinus was found by accident in the CT scan although a conventional (panoramic) radiograph revealed no signs of peri-implant radiolucency (Fig. 9). This was after a healing period of 32 months since sinus augmentation. The fortuitously discovered radiolucent portion can be described as incomplete bone formation or bone cavity in the augmented maxillary sinus. Nevertheless, the dental implants that were placed in the grafted sinus had been functioning well after prosthetic loading for more than 60 months and no enlargement of the bone cavity was found in follow-up radiographic views (Fig. 10). The patient has had no subjective symptoms such as discomfort or pain in the #16i and 17i area and has been receiving follow-up care on a regular basis.


Incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation: A case report on radiological findings by computerized tomography at follow-up.

Lee KS, Kwon YH, Herr Y, Shin SI, Lee JY, Chung JH - J Periodontal Implant Sci (2010)

Bone cavity in #16i and 17i area was found in the computed tomography scan (32 months after the sinus augmentation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021169&req=5

Figure 9: Bone cavity in #16i and 17i area was found in the computed tomography scan (32 months after the sinus augmentation).
Mentions: The implants placed in the augmented sinus were clinically healthy and the implant-supported restorations had been functioning successfully at 17 months after initial loading. Unexpectedly, the patient visited the dental clinic with the chief complaints of pain on biting in the upper right 2nd premolar (#15) since he had eaten hard food 3 days earlier. The #15 tooth was diagnosed as cracked and endodontic therapy was required. During endodontic therapy, a CT scan was taken to locate the buccal canal of the tooth. Peri-implant radiolucency in the apical portion of the implant placed in the augmented maxillary sinus was found by accident in the CT scan although a conventional (panoramic) radiograph revealed no signs of peri-implant radiolucency (Fig. 9). This was after a healing period of 32 months since sinus augmentation. The fortuitously discovered radiolucent portion can be described as incomplete bone formation or bone cavity in the augmented maxillary sinus. Nevertheless, the dental implants that were placed in the grafted sinus had been functioning well after prosthetic loading for more than 60 months and no enlargement of the bone cavity was found in follow-up radiographic views (Fig. 10). The patient has had no subjective symptoms such as discomfort or pain in the #16i and 17i area and has been receiving follow-up care on a regular basis.

Bottom Line: The result of this case suggests that patients who received maxillary sinus augmentation may experience incomplete bone formation.It is possible that 1) osteoconductive graft material with poor osteogenic potential, 2) overpacking of graft material that restricts the blood supply, and 3) bone microbial contamination may cause the appearance of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation.Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of this unexpected result and care must be taken to prevent it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontology, Kyung Hee University School of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this case report is to present a case of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation.

Methods: A patient having alveolar bone resorption of the maxillary posterior edentulous region and advanced pneumatization of the maxillary sinus was treated with sinus elevation using deproteinized bovine bone in the Department of Periodontology, Kyung Hee University School of Dentistry and re-evaluated with computed tomography (CT) follow-up.

Results: Even though there were no significant findings or abnormal radiolucency on the panoramic radiograph, incomplete bone formation in the central portion of the augmented sinus was found fortuitously in the CT scan. The CT scan revealed peri-implant radiolucency in the apical portion of the implant placed in the augmented maxillary sinus. Nevertheless, the dental implants placed in the grafted sinus still functioned well at over 15 months follow-up.

Conclusions: The result of this case suggests that patients who received maxillary sinus augmentation may experience incomplete bone formation. It is possible that 1) osteoconductive graft material with poor osteogenic potential, 2) overpacking of graft material that restricts the blood supply, and 3) bone microbial contamination may cause the appearance of incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of this unexpected result and care must be taken to prevent it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus