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Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro.

Lee JY, Seol YJ, Park JR, Park YJ, Chung CP - J Periodontal Implant Sci (2010)

Bottom Line: The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity.Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel.These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface.

Methods: Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent.

Results: SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel.

Conclusions: These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparative study of the antimicrobial activity of root planing agents. (A) Inhibition diameter of aerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. (B) Inhibition diameter of anaerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. 1: experimental gel, 2: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 3: citric acid, 4: chlorhexidine, 5: Triton X-100, 6: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The data represent the mean±SD from triplicate experiments (N=4). *P<0.05, compared to PBS-treated filter paper diameter.
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Figure 4: Comparative study of the antimicrobial activity of root planing agents. (A) Inhibition diameter of aerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. (B) Inhibition diameter of anaerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. 1: experimental gel, 2: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 3: citric acid, 4: chlorhexidine, 5: Triton X-100, 6: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The data represent the mean±SD from triplicate experiments (N=4). *P<0.05, compared to PBS-treated filter paper diameter.

Mentions: Differing degrees of inhibition of bacteria growth were found with the experimental gel, 24% EDTA, chlorhexidine, and PBS (Fig. 4). The experimental gel-treated disks inhibited more than 23 mm of bacterial growth for six strains. The student's t-test analysis showed a statistically significant difference between the ID of the experimental gel and that of PBS. The ID measurements of 24% EDTA and chlorhexidine were lower than that of the experimental gel. However, the inhibition by Triton-X100 and citric acid failed to reach statistical significance relative to PBS. The pattern of anaerobic bacterial growth was similar to that of aerobic bacterial growth.


Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro.

Lee JY, Seol YJ, Park JR, Park YJ, Chung CP - J Periodontal Implant Sci (2010)

Comparative study of the antimicrobial activity of root planing agents. (A) Inhibition diameter of aerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. (B) Inhibition diameter of anaerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. 1: experimental gel, 2: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 3: citric acid, 4: chlorhexidine, 5: Triton X-100, 6: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The data represent the mean±SD from triplicate experiments (N=4). *P<0.05, compared to PBS-treated filter paper diameter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3021165&req=5

Figure 4: Comparative study of the antimicrobial activity of root planing agents. (A) Inhibition diameter of aerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. (B) Inhibition diameter of anaerobic bacteria cultured agar plate. 1: experimental gel, 2: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 3: citric acid, 4: chlorhexidine, 5: Triton X-100, 6: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The data represent the mean±SD from triplicate experiments (N=4). *P<0.05, compared to PBS-treated filter paper diameter.
Mentions: Differing degrees of inhibition of bacteria growth were found with the experimental gel, 24% EDTA, chlorhexidine, and PBS (Fig. 4). The experimental gel-treated disks inhibited more than 23 mm of bacterial growth for six strains. The student's t-test analysis showed a statistically significant difference between the ID of the experimental gel and that of PBS. The ID measurements of 24% EDTA and chlorhexidine were lower than that of the experimental gel. However, the inhibition by Triton-X100 and citric acid failed to reach statistical significance relative to PBS. The pattern of anaerobic bacterial growth was similar to that of aerobic bacterial growth.

Bottom Line: The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity.Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel.These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface.

Methods: Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent.

Results: SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel.

Conclusions: These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus