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Smoking and multiple sclerosis: an updated meta-analysis.

Handel AE, Williamson AJ, Disanto G, Dobson R, Giovannoni G, Ramagopalan SV - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Our results show that smoking is associated with MS susceptibility (conservative: risk ratio (RR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.63, p < 10⁻¹⁵; non-conservative: RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39-1.66, p < 10⁻¹⁹).We also analysed 4 studies reporting risk of secondary progression in MS and found that this fell just short of statistical significance with considerable heterogeneity (RR 1.88, 95% CI 0.98-3.61, p = 0.06).Our results demonstrate that cigarette smoking is important in determining MS susceptibility but the effect on the progression of disease is less certain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a leading cause of disability in young adults. Susceptibility to MS is determined by environmental exposure on the background of genetic risk factors. A previous meta-analysis suggested that smoking was an important risk factor for MS but many other studies have been published since then.

Methods/principal findings: We performed a Medline search to identify articles published that investigated MS risk following cigarette smoking. A total of 14 articles were included in this study. This represented data on 3,052 cases and 457,619 controls. We analysed these studies in both a conservative (limiting our analysis to only those where smoking behaviour was described prior to disease onset) and non-conservative manner. Our results show that smoking is associated with MS susceptibility (conservative: risk ratio (RR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.63, p < 10⁻¹⁵; non-conservative: RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39-1.66, p < 10⁻¹⁹). We also analysed 4 studies reporting risk of secondary progression in MS and found that this fell just short of statistical significance with considerable heterogeneity (RR 1.88, 95% CI 0.98-3.61, p = 0.06).

Discussion: Our results demonstrate that cigarette smoking is important in determining MS susceptibility but the effect on the progression of disease is less certain. Further work is needed to understand the mechanism behind this association and how smoking integrates with other established risk factors.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Plots of relative risk against latitude and sex-ratio.Error bars show 95% confidence intervals of relative risk estimates.
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pone-0016149-g004: Plots of relative risk against latitude and sex-ratio.Error bars show 95% confidence intervals of relative risk estimates.

Mentions: We tested both latitude and sex-ratio for correlation with the natural log of RR for each study using linear weighted fit (figure 4). No significant correlation was found for either (latitude: r2<0.01, p = 0.99; sex-ratio: r2 = 0.09, p = 0.40).


Smoking and multiple sclerosis: an updated meta-analysis.

Handel AE, Williamson AJ, Disanto G, Dobson R, Giovannoni G, Ramagopalan SV - PLoS ONE (2011)

Plots of relative risk against latitude and sex-ratio.Error bars show 95% confidence intervals of relative risk estimates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3020969&req=5

pone-0016149-g004: Plots of relative risk against latitude and sex-ratio.Error bars show 95% confidence intervals of relative risk estimates.
Mentions: We tested both latitude and sex-ratio for correlation with the natural log of RR for each study using linear weighted fit (figure 4). No significant correlation was found for either (latitude: r2<0.01, p = 0.99; sex-ratio: r2 = 0.09, p = 0.40).

Bottom Line: Our results show that smoking is associated with MS susceptibility (conservative: risk ratio (RR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.63, p < 10⁻¹⁵; non-conservative: RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39-1.66, p < 10⁻¹⁹).We also analysed 4 studies reporting risk of secondary progression in MS and found that this fell just short of statistical significance with considerable heterogeneity (RR 1.88, 95% CI 0.98-3.61, p = 0.06).Our results demonstrate that cigarette smoking is important in determining MS susceptibility but the effect on the progression of disease is less certain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a leading cause of disability in young adults. Susceptibility to MS is determined by environmental exposure on the background of genetic risk factors. A previous meta-analysis suggested that smoking was an important risk factor for MS but many other studies have been published since then.

Methods/principal findings: We performed a Medline search to identify articles published that investigated MS risk following cigarette smoking. A total of 14 articles were included in this study. This represented data on 3,052 cases and 457,619 controls. We analysed these studies in both a conservative (limiting our analysis to only those where smoking behaviour was described prior to disease onset) and non-conservative manner. Our results show that smoking is associated with MS susceptibility (conservative: risk ratio (RR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.63, p < 10⁻¹⁵; non-conservative: RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39-1.66, p < 10⁻¹⁹). We also analysed 4 studies reporting risk of secondary progression in MS and found that this fell just short of statistical significance with considerable heterogeneity (RR 1.88, 95% CI 0.98-3.61, p = 0.06).

Discussion: Our results demonstrate that cigarette smoking is important in determining MS susceptibility but the effect on the progression of disease is less certain. Further work is needed to understand the mechanism behind this association and how smoking integrates with other established risk factors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus