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A non-Lévy random walk in chacma baboons: what does it mean?

Sueur C - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research.Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process.Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America. csueur@ulb.ac.be

ABSTRACT
The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research. Recent results, however, have generated controversy about this conclusion since animals also display alternatives to the Lévy walk such as the Brownian walk or mental maps and because movement patterns found in some species only seem to depend on food patches distribution. Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process. Moreover this Brownian walk is not the main process responsible for movement patterns of baboons. Findings about their speed and trajectories show that baboons use metal maps and memory to find resources. Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

Show MeSH
Four daily trajectories of the study group of chacma baboons.S represents the location where animals started their daily travel. E represents the location where animals ended their travel. Circles represent sleeping sites. Squares are waterholes. The triangle is a clay site.
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pone-0016131-g001: Four daily trajectories of the study group of chacma baboons.S represents the location where animals started their daily travel. E represents the location where animals ended their travel. Circles represent sleeping sites. Squares are waterholes. The triangle is a clay site.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows four daily trajectories of the group. These trajectories seem to be made up of steps of different lengths. Moreover, animals seemed to go first to a waterhole (observed in 100% of cases), and then to go everyday to a clay site (observed in 83.3% of cases), to forage and eventually to come back at the end of the day to their sleeping site, doing a kind of ellipse all along their home range.


A non-Lévy random walk in chacma baboons: what does it mean?

Sueur C - PLoS ONE (2011)

Four daily trajectories of the study group of chacma baboons.S represents the location where animals started their daily travel. E represents the location where animals ended their travel. Circles represent sleeping sites. Squares are waterholes. The triangle is a clay site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3020952&req=5

pone-0016131-g001: Four daily trajectories of the study group of chacma baboons.S represents the location where animals started their daily travel. E represents the location where animals ended their travel. Circles represent sleeping sites. Squares are waterholes. The triangle is a clay site.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows four daily trajectories of the group. These trajectories seem to be made up of steps of different lengths. Moreover, animals seemed to go first to a waterhole (observed in 100% of cases), and then to go everyday to a clay site (observed in 83.3% of cases), to forage and eventually to come back at the end of the day to their sleeping site, doing a kind of ellipse all along their home range.

Bottom Line: The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research.Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process.Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America. csueur@ulb.ac.be

ABSTRACT
The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research. Recent results, however, have generated controversy about this conclusion since animals also display alternatives to the Lévy walk such as the Brownian walk or mental maps and because movement patterns found in some species only seem to depend on food patches distribution. Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process. Moreover this Brownian walk is not the main process responsible for movement patterns of baboons. Findings about their speed and trajectories show that baboons use metal maps and memory to find resources. Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

Show MeSH