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10 years of Malaria Journal: how did Open Access change publication patterns?

Hommel M - Malar. J. (2010)

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Fifteen years ago, most publications were paper-based, accessible only by subscription - be it a personal or a library subscription... By the late 1990s, this 'traditional' mode of access to scientific literature was about to change dramatically, as the result of a combination of events: the improvement of personal computer hardware (with computers becoming faster and cheaper every year), public access to internet and the world-wide web, online publishing and, most of all, the will of the scientific community to make research more easily available... BioMed Central which is now part of the Springer Group, publishes 206 peer-reviewed Open Access journals, including Malaria Journal, started in 2002, and Parasite & Vectors, started in 2008... The fact that articles in BioMed Central journals are immediately backed-up in the PubMed Central repository provides them with a long-term security other online journals may not provide... Considering that over 90% of malaria mortality occurs in Africa, it is a sad observation that in the 20 Africa-based medical journals listed in the PubMed search for 2009, a total of only 52 articles was published there (see Figure 3)... This does not reflect any lack of African medical journals-- there are many -- but rather reflects the fact that many of these are still paper-based, or online via subscription only, are irregular in their production and are often not discoverable via PubMed... Since its launch almost 10 years ago, Malaria Journal has promoted itself as a journal accepting papers on 'malaria in its broadest sense and publishing exclusively papers on malaria'... It was of interest, therefore, to look at its publication output in 2009, compared to the whole field (using the 2,584 papers found through the PubMed search), as well as to one of the most respected 'traditional' tropical medicine journals, the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (see Figure 5)... This year, the Malaria Journal and BioMed Central are organizing a three-day Conference on 'Parasite to Prevention', with the abstracts of the presentations and posters presented at the conference to be published in Malaria Journal... Showing three categories: those have published more than 25 papers, those that have published between 6-24 papers, and those who published 5 or less... Journals that are highlighted in yellow are those that are known to be available for 'immediate' Open Access... Click here for file

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Evolution of the impact factor of Malaria Journal compared to 15 journals, known to publish a substantial number of malaria papers every year.
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Figure 4: Evolution of the impact factor of Malaria Journal compared to 15 journals, known to publish a substantial number of malaria papers every year.

Mentions: The exponential growth of Malaria Journal over the past nine years can be explained by a combination of factors: having been the first open access journal in tropical medicine, created at the very start of the Open Access movement, having a prestigious and dynamic Editorial Board, making the effort to copy-edit all articles in a traditional fashion, and helping less-experienced authors from the developing world to reshape their manuscript to an acceptable standard. Figure 4 shows the evolution of the journal over time, in terms of its impact factor, in comparison with others; Malaria Journal has now been a leader amongst specialist tropical medicine journals for a few years and the average output this year has reached a paper per day. Quality is not only judged by how often an article is cited, but also by the number of times it is consulted online: in a way, this is how readers show their interest in a paper, and this is recognized on the paper by a 'highly accessed' tag.


10 years of Malaria Journal: how did Open Access change publication patterns?

Hommel M - Malar. J. (2010)

Evolution of the impact factor of Malaria Journal compared to 15 journals, known to publish a substantial number of malaria papers every year.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3020680&req=5

Figure 4: Evolution of the impact factor of Malaria Journal compared to 15 journals, known to publish a substantial number of malaria papers every year.
Mentions: The exponential growth of Malaria Journal over the past nine years can be explained by a combination of factors: having been the first open access journal in tropical medicine, created at the very start of the Open Access movement, having a prestigious and dynamic Editorial Board, making the effort to copy-edit all articles in a traditional fashion, and helping less-experienced authors from the developing world to reshape their manuscript to an acceptable standard. Figure 4 shows the evolution of the journal over time, in terms of its impact factor, in comparison with others; Malaria Journal has now been a leader amongst specialist tropical medicine journals for a few years and the average output this year has reached a paper per day. Quality is not only judged by how often an article is cited, but also by the number of times it is consulted online: in a way, this is how readers show their interest in a paper, and this is recognized on the paper by a 'highly accessed' tag.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Fifteen years ago, most publications were paper-based, accessible only by subscription - be it a personal or a library subscription... By the late 1990s, this 'traditional' mode of access to scientific literature was about to change dramatically, as the result of a combination of events: the improvement of personal computer hardware (with computers becoming faster and cheaper every year), public access to internet and the world-wide web, online publishing and, most of all, the will of the scientific community to make research more easily available... BioMed Central which is now part of the Springer Group, publishes 206 peer-reviewed Open Access journals, including Malaria Journal, started in 2002, and Parasite & Vectors, started in 2008... The fact that articles in BioMed Central journals are immediately backed-up in the PubMed Central repository provides them with a long-term security other online journals may not provide... Considering that over 90% of malaria mortality occurs in Africa, it is a sad observation that in the 20 Africa-based medical journals listed in the PubMed search for 2009, a total of only 52 articles was published there (see Figure 3)... This does not reflect any lack of African medical journals-- there are many -- but rather reflects the fact that many of these are still paper-based, or online via subscription only, are irregular in their production and are often not discoverable via PubMed... Since its launch almost 10 years ago, Malaria Journal has promoted itself as a journal accepting papers on 'malaria in its broadest sense and publishing exclusively papers on malaria'... It was of interest, therefore, to look at its publication output in 2009, compared to the whole field (using the 2,584 papers found through the PubMed search), as well as to one of the most respected 'traditional' tropical medicine journals, the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (see Figure 5)... This year, the Malaria Journal and BioMed Central are organizing a three-day Conference on 'Parasite to Prevention', with the abstracts of the presentations and posters presented at the conference to be published in Malaria Journal... Showing three categories: those have published more than 25 papers, those that have published between 6-24 papers, and those who published 5 or less... Journals that are highlighted in yellow are those that are known to be available for 'immediate' Open Access... Click here for file

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus