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Effects of preterm birth on cortical thickness measured in adolescence.

Nagy Z, Lagercrantz H, Hutton C - Cereb. Cortex (2010)

Bottom Line: The cortex was significantly thinner in ex-preterm individuals in focal regions of the temporal and parietal cortices as indicated by voxel-wise t-tests.Although these results were not significant on voxel-wise tests, the spatially coherent arrangement of the thinning in ex-preterm individuals made it notable.When the group of ex-preterm individuals was divided by gestational age or BW, the thinning tended to be more pronounced in the anterior and posterior poles in those born nearer term or with a BW closer to 1500 g.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman and Child Health, Neonatal Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 171 76, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Despite the extensive research into brain development after preterm birth, few studies have investigated its long-term effects on cortical thickness. The Stockholm Neonatal Project included infants between 1988 and 1993 with birth weight (BW) ≤ 1500 g. Using a previously published method, cortical thickness was estimated on T(1)-weighted 3D anatomical images acquired from 74 ex-preterm and 69 term-born adolescents (mean age 14.92 years). The cortex was significantly thinner in ex-preterm individuals in focal regions of the temporal and parietal cortices as indicated by voxel-wise t-tests. In addition, large regions around the central sulcus and temporal lobe as well as parts of the frontal and occipital lobes tended also to be thinner in the ex-preterm group. Although these results were not significant on voxel-wise tests, the spatially coherent arrangement of the thinning in ex-preterm individuals made it notable. When the group of ex-preterm individuals was divided by gestational age or BW, the thinning tended to be more pronounced in the anterior and posterior poles in those born nearer term or with a BW closer to 1500 g. These results support the notion that preterm birth is a risk factor for long-term development of cortical thickness.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Maps of cortical thickness differences. Differences in thickness are displayed in millimeters. In a large set of regions, the ex-preterm adolescents possessed thinner cortex (a), whereas in a few specific areas, it was found to be thicker (b). Areas depicted with a dotted line were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correction for multiple comparisons. All insets are in neurological convention (left is left) except the orbital view (third column), which is displayed in radiological convention (left is right).
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fig1: Maps of cortical thickness differences. Differences in thickness are displayed in millimeters. In a large set of regions, the ex-preterm adolescents possessed thinner cortex (a), whereas in a few specific areas, it was found to be thicker (b). Areas depicted with a dotted line were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correction for multiple comparisons. All insets are in neurological convention (left is left) except the orbital view (third column), which is displayed in radiological convention (left is right).

Mentions: Surface projections of cortical thickness differences between ex-preterm and control adolescents are shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3. Thinner cortex was observed in widespread regions in ex-preterm adolescents compared with controls (Fig. 1a). After correcting for multiple comparisons, differences in the bilateral middle temporal regions and the posterior inferior parietal cortices were statistically significant (dotted lines) and in the order of 0.25 and 0.20 mm, respectively. Two small regions of significantly thicker cortex were observed in ex-preterm adolescents compared with controls in the right anterior inferior temporal gyrus and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in the order of 2.0 mm (Fig. 1b).


Effects of preterm birth on cortical thickness measured in adolescence.

Nagy Z, Lagercrantz H, Hutton C - Cereb. Cortex (2010)

Maps of cortical thickness differences. Differences in thickness are displayed in millimeters. In a large set of regions, the ex-preterm adolescents possessed thinner cortex (a), whereas in a few specific areas, it was found to be thicker (b). Areas depicted with a dotted line were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correction for multiple comparisons. All insets are in neurological convention (left is left) except the orbital view (third column), which is displayed in radiological convention (left is right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3020580&req=5

fig1: Maps of cortical thickness differences. Differences in thickness are displayed in millimeters. In a large set of regions, the ex-preterm adolescents possessed thinner cortex (a), whereas in a few specific areas, it was found to be thicker (b). Areas depicted with a dotted line were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correction for multiple comparisons. All insets are in neurological convention (left is left) except the orbital view (third column), which is displayed in radiological convention (left is right).
Mentions: Surface projections of cortical thickness differences between ex-preterm and control adolescents are shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3. Thinner cortex was observed in widespread regions in ex-preterm adolescents compared with controls (Fig. 1a). After correcting for multiple comparisons, differences in the bilateral middle temporal regions and the posterior inferior parietal cortices were statistically significant (dotted lines) and in the order of 0.25 and 0.20 mm, respectively. Two small regions of significantly thicker cortex were observed in ex-preterm adolescents compared with controls in the right anterior inferior temporal gyrus and the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in the order of 2.0 mm (Fig. 1b).

Bottom Line: The cortex was significantly thinner in ex-preterm individuals in focal regions of the temporal and parietal cortices as indicated by voxel-wise t-tests.Although these results were not significant on voxel-wise tests, the spatially coherent arrangement of the thinning in ex-preterm individuals made it notable.When the group of ex-preterm individuals was divided by gestational age or BW, the thinning tended to be more pronounced in the anterior and posterior poles in those born nearer term or with a BW closer to 1500 g.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Woman and Child Health, Neonatal Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 171 76, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Despite the extensive research into brain development after preterm birth, few studies have investigated its long-term effects on cortical thickness. The Stockholm Neonatal Project included infants between 1988 and 1993 with birth weight (BW) ≤ 1500 g. Using a previously published method, cortical thickness was estimated on T(1)-weighted 3D anatomical images acquired from 74 ex-preterm and 69 term-born adolescents (mean age 14.92 years). The cortex was significantly thinner in ex-preterm individuals in focal regions of the temporal and parietal cortices as indicated by voxel-wise t-tests. In addition, large regions around the central sulcus and temporal lobe as well as parts of the frontal and occipital lobes tended also to be thinner in the ex-preterm group. Although these results were not significant on voxel-wise tests, the spatially coherent arrangement of the thinning in ex-preterm individuals made it notable. When the group of ex-preterm individuals was divided by gestational age or BW, the thinning tended to be more pronounced in the anterior and posterior poles in those born nearer term or with a BW closer to 1500 g. These results support the notion that preterm birth is a risk factor for long-term development of cortical thickness.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus