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High connectivity between reduced cortical thickness and disrupted white matter tracts in long-standing type 1 diabetes.

Franc DT, Kodl CT, Mueller BA, Muetzel RL, Lim KO, Seaquist ER - Diabetes (2010)

Bottom Line: Fractional anisotropy measurements were made on major cerebral white matter tracts, and DTI tractography was performed to identify cortical regions with high connectivity to these tracts.Posterior white matter tracts with reduced fractional anisotropy (optic radiations, posterior corona radiata, and the splenium region of the corpus callosum) were found to have high connectivity with a number of posterior cortical regions, including the cuneus, precuneus, fusiform, and posterior parietal cortical regions.A significant reduction in cortical thickness in the diabetic group was observed in the regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations and posterior corona radiata tracts (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Previous studies have observed disruptions in brain white and gray matter structure in individuals with type 1 diabetes, and these structural differences have been associated with neurocognitive testing deficiencies. This study investigated the relationship between cerebral cortical thickness reductions and white matter microstructural integrity loss in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes and in healthy control subjects using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).

Research design and methods: Twenty-five subjects with type 1 diabetes for at least 15 years and 25 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent structural T1 and proton-density and DTI on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Fractional anisotropy measurements were made on major cerebral white matter tracts, and DTI tractography was performed to identify cortical regions with high connectivity to these tracts.

Results: Posterior white matter tracts with reduced fractional anisotropy (optic radiations, posterior corona radiata, and the splenium region of the corpus callosum) were found to have high connectivity with a number of posterior cortical regions, including the cuneus, precuneus, fusiform, and posterior parietal cortical regions. A significant reduction in cortical thickness in the diabetic group was observed in the regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations and posterior corona radiata tracts (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: The direct relationship between white and gray matter structural pathology has not been previously demonstrated in subjects with long-standing type 1 diabetes. The relationship between posterior white matter microstructural integrity disruption and lower cortical thickness demonstrated using a novel DTI connectivity technique suggests a common or interrelated pathophysiological mechanism in type 1 diabetes.

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The average fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata white matter region of interest (left) and optic radiations (right) is plotted against average cortical thickness for cortical regions found to have high connectivity to each of these seed regions. Diabetic subjects are denoted by ○; control subjects are denoted by ×.
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Figure 3: The average fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata white matter region of interest (left) and optic radiations (right) is plotted against average cortical thickness for cortical regions found to have high connectivity to each of these seed regions. Diabetic subjects are denoted by ○; control subjects are denoted by ×.

Mentions: Significantly lower average cortical thickness was found in the subjects with type 1 diabetes for cortical regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations (P = 0.012, d = −0.86) and posterior corona radiata tracts (P = 0.031, d = −0.74). Figure 3 shows the relationship between average fractional anisotropy in the white matter seed regions of interest and the average cortical thickness in cortical regions found to have high connectivity with these seeds. These plots show that subjects with type 1 diabetes cluster with lower fractional anisotropy and lower cortical thickness. A Pearson correlation analysis performed across all subjects between fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata and connected cortex resulted in r = 0.427 (P = 0.002), and for fractional anisotropy in the optic radiations and connected cortex data r = 0.503 (P < 0.001).


High connectivity between reduced cortical thickness and disrupted white matter tracts in long-standing type 1 diabetes.

Franc DT, Kodl CT, Mueller BA, Muetzel RL, Lim KO, Seaquist ER - Diabetes (2010)

The average fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata white matter region of interest (left) and optic radiations (right) is plotted against average cortical thickness for cortical regions found to have high connectivity to each of these seed regions. Diabetic subjects are denoted by ○; control subjects are denoted by ×.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3012188&req=5

Figure 3: The average fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata white matter region of interest (left) and optic radiations (right) is plotted against average cortical thickness for cortical regions found to have high connectivity to each of these seed regions. Diabetic subjects are denoted by ○; control subjects are denoted by ×.
Mentions: Significantly lower average cortical thickness was found in the subjects with type 1 diabetes for cortical regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations (P = 0.012, d = −0.86) and posterior corona radiata tracts (P = 0.031, d = −0.74). Figure 3 shows the relationship between average fractional anisotropy in the white matter seed regions of interest and the average cortical thickness in cortical regions found to have high connectivity with these seeds. These plots show that subjects with type 1 diabetes cluster with lower fractional anisotropy and lower cortical thickness. A Pearson correlation analysis performed across all subjects between fractional anisotropy for the posterior corona radiata and connected cortex resulted in r = 0.427 (P = 0.002), and for fractional anisotropy in the optic radiations and connected cortex data r = 0.503 (P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: Fractional anisotropy measurements were made on major cerebral white matter tracts, and DTI tractography was performed to identify cortical regions with high connectivity to these tracts.Posterior white matter tracts with reduced fractional anisotropy (optic radiations, posterior corona radiata, and the splenium region of the corpus callosum) were found to have high connectivity with a number of posterior cortical regions, including the cuneus, precuneus, fusiform, and posterior parietal cortical regions.A significant reduction in cortical thickness in the diabetic group was observed in the regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations and posterior corona radiata tracts (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Previous studies have observed disruptions in brain white and gray matter structure in individuals with type 1 diabetes, and these structural differences have been associated with neurocognitive testing deficiencies. This study investigated the relationship between cerebral cortical thickness reductions and white matter microstructural integrity loss in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes and in healthy control subjects using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).

Research design and methods: Twenty-five subjects with type 1 diabetes for at least 15 years and 25 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent structural T1 and proton-density and DTI on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Fractional anisotropy measurements were made on major cerebral white matter tracts, and DTI tractography was performed to identify cortical regions with high connectivity to these tracts.

Results: Posterior white matter tracts with reduced fractional anisotropy (optic radiations, posterior corona radiata, and the splenium region of the corpus callosum) were found to have high connectivity with a number of posterior cortical regions, including the cuneus, precuneus, fusiform, and posterior parietal cortical regions. A significant reduction in cortical thickness in the diabetic group was observed in the regions with high connectivity to the optic radiations and posterior corona radiata tracts (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: The direct relationship between white and gray matter structural pathology has not been previously demonstrated in subjects with long-standing type 1 diabetes. The relationship between posterior white matter microstructural integrity disruption and lower cortical thickness demonstrated using a novel DTI connectivity technique suggests a common or interrelated pathophysiological mechanism in type 1 diabetes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus