Limits...
Childhood Bartter's syndrome: An Indian case series.

Sampathkumar K, Muralidharan U, Kannan A, Ramakrishnan M, Ajeshkumar R - Indian J Nephrol (2010)

Bottom Line: Indomethacin or ibuprofen therapy resulted in marked improvement in general condition of these children.In conclusion, a high index of suspicion should be entertained in children with failure to thrive to diagnose BS.Therapy with NSAIDs leads to marked improvement in the general well being.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre, Madurai - 625 107, India.

ABSTRACT
This is a retrospective analysis of children diagnosed with Bartter's syndrome (BS) between 2001 and 2009 in our hospital. Seven children (six males) were diagnosed with BS. The mean age at presentation was 6.5 ± 4.9 months. The presenting features were failure to thrive,vomiting, polyuria, and dehydration. All children were normotensive at admission. The children exhibited alkalemia (pH, 7.58 ± 0.03), hypokalemia (serum potassium, 2.62 ± 0.47 mEq/l), hypochloremia (serum chloride, 82.83 ± 16.7 mEq/l), and hyponatremia (serum sodium, 126.85 ± 3.56 mEq/l). Disproportionate urinary wasting of sodium, potassium, and chloride were seen. The diagnosis was confirmed by elevated serum levels of both renin and aldosterone with normotension. Indomethacin or ibuprofen therapy resulted in marked improvement in general condition of these children. In conclusion, a high index of suspicion should be entertained in children with failure to thrive to diagnose BS. Therapy with NSAIDs leads to marked improvement in the general well being.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bartter’s child before treatment showing severe dehydration
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3008951&req=5

Figure 0001: Bartter’s child before treatment showing severe dehydration

Mentions: These children initially were treated with isotonic saline and potassium chloride replacement. After 48 hours of parenteral therapy, these babies were started on oral potassium chloride supplements. Three babies were treated with oral Ibuprofen therapy in a dose of 15 mg/kg/day. Three were given indomethacin therapy, in a dose of 2 mg/kg/day. Four babies were on regular follow-up over a period of 3 to 12 months. Weight gain was sufficient to achieve catch-up growth in two babies, whereas the rest were lagging behind in growth. Figures 1 and 2 captures the marked improvement in the general condition of a child after starting therapy. Two babies died soon after diagnosis due to aspiration pneumonia before specific therapy could be started. One baby was lost to follow-up.


Childhood Bartter's syndrome: An Indian case series.

Sampathkumar K, Muralidharan U, Kannan A, Ramakrishnan M, Ajeshkumar R - Indian J Nephrol (2010)

Bartter’s child before treatment showing severe dehydration
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3008951&req=5

Figure 0001: Bartter’s child before treatment showing severe dehydration
Mentions: These children initially were treated with isotonic saline and potassium chloride replacement. After 48 hours of parenteral therapy, these babies were started on oral potassium chloride supplements. Three babies were treated with oral Ibuprofen therapy in a dose of 15 mg/kg/day. Three were given indomethacin therapy, in a dose of 2 mg/kg/day. Four babies were on regular follow-up over a period of 3 to 12 months. Weight gain was sufficient to achieve catch-up growth in two babies, whereas the rest were lagging behind in growth. Figures 1 and 2 captures the marked improvement in the general condition of a child after starting therapy. Two babies died soon after diagnosis due to aspiration pneumonia before specific therapy could be started. One baby was lost to follow-up.

Bottom Line: Indomethacin or ibuprofen therapy resulted in marked improvement in general condition of these children.In conclusion, a high index of suspicion should be entertained in children with failure to thrive to diagnose BS.Therapy with NSAIDs leads to marked improvement in the general well being.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Centre, Madurai - 625 107, India.

ABSTRACT
This is a retrospective analysis of children diagnosed with Bartter's syndrome (BS) between 2001 and 2009 in our hospital. Seven children (six males) were diagnosed with BS. The mean age at presentation was 6.5 ± 4.9 months. The presenting features were failure to thrive,vomiting, polyuria, and dehydration. All children were normotensive at admission. The children exhibited alkalemia (pH, 7.58 ± 0.03), hypokalemia (serum potassium, 2.62 ± 0.47 mEq/l), hypochloremia (serum chloride, 82.83 ± 16.7 mEq/l), and hyponatremia (serum sodium, 126.85 ± 3.56 mEq/l). Disproportionate urinary wasting of sodium, potassium, and chloride were seen. The diagnosis was confirmed by elevated serum levels of both renin and aldosterone with normotension. Indomethacin or ibuprofen therapy resulted in marked improvement in general condition of these children. In conclusion, a high index of suspicion should be entertained in children with failure to thrive to diagnose BS. Therapy with NSAIDs leads to marked improvement in the general well being.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus