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The role of fasting versus non-fasting triglycerides in ischemic stroke: a systematic review.

Leonards C, Ebinger M, Batluk J, Malzahn U, Heuschmann P, Endres M - Front Neurol (2010)

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics, study samples, methods, and primary outcomes varied.Of 13 prospective cohort studies, nine assessed triglyceride concentrations in the fasting state.The available data are inconsistent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To synthesize results from pertinent studies and determine if fasting and/or non-fasting triglycerides are a risk factor for ischemic stroke.

Method: We performed two independent systematic literature searches using the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases to identify studies examining the relationship between fasting and non-fasting triglyceride concentrations and ischemic stroke risk. A meta-analysis was performed using ischemic stroke as a primary endpoint.

Results: Twenty-five reports were identified, including 13 prospective cohort and 12 case-control studies. Baseline characteristics, study samples, methods, and primary outcomes varied. Of 13 prospective cohort studies, nine assessed triglyceride concentrations in the fasting state. Seven of these identified triglycerides as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke risk (n = 1624 ischemic cases). Three prospective cohort studies identified a positive association between elevated non-fasting triglyceride concentrations and ischemic stroke risk (n = 2050 ischemic cases). One prospective cohort study that compared fasting and non-fasting triglycerides identified only non-fasting triglycerides as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Of 12 case-control studies identified, five identified a positive relationship between ischemic stroke risk and elevated fasting triglycerides (n = 838 cases). Seven case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis (n = 1996 ischemic stroke cases), revealing an odds ratio of 1.15 (95% CI, 1.08-1.21).

Conclusions: The available data are inconsistent. The relationship between triglyceride levels and ischemic stroke needs further investigation under standardized conditions. We recommend a standardized triglyceride tolerance test to further investigate the associations between fasting versus non-fasting triglyceride levels and ischemic stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram illustrating the subdivisions of the stroke literature pertaining to triglyceride levels.
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Figure 1: Flow diagram illustrating the subdivisions of the stroke literature pertaining to triglyceride levels.

Mentions: This review was conducted in accordance with MOOSE guidelines (Stroup et al., 2000;). We identified original epidemiological studies assessing the relationship between stroke risk and fasting or non-fasting triglyceride concentrations using two independent computerized literature searches (Figure 1;). The PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were searched by Christopher Leonards and Jana Batluk between April 14th and 27th April, 2010, using the medical subject heading (MESH) terms “triglycerides” and “stroke.” Hand searching was also performed of all included studies and relevant review articles. Unpublished studies were identified by searching the book of abstracts from the European Stroke Conferences ranging from the years 2006 through 2008.


The role of fasting versus non-fasting triglycerides in ischemic stroke: a systematic review.

Leonards C, Ebinger M, Batluk J, Malzahn U, Heuschmann P, Endres M - Front Neurol (2010)

Flow diagram illustrating the subdivisions of the stroke literature pertaining to triglyceride levels.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3008919&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram illustrating the subdivisions of the stroke literature pertaining to triglyceride levels.
Mentions: This review was conducted in accordance with MOOSE guidelines (Stroup et al., 2000;). We identified original epidemiological studies assessing the relationship between stroke risk and fasting or non-fasting triglyceride concentrations using two independent computerized literature searches (Figure 1;). The PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were searched by Christopher Leonards and Jana Batluk between April 14th and 27th April, 2010, using the medical subject heading (MESH) terms “triglycerides” and “stroke.” Hand searching was also performed of all included studies and relevant review articles. Unpublished studies were identified by searching the book of abstracts from the European Stroke Conferences ranging from the years 2006 through 2008.

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics, study samples, methods, and primary outcomes varied.Of 13 prospective cohort studies, nine assessed triglyceride concentrations in the fasting state.The available data are inconsistent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To synthesize results from pertinent studies and determine if fasting and/or non-fasting triglycerides are a risk factor for ischemic stroke.

Method: We performed two independent systematic literature searches using the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases to identify studies examining the relationship between fasting and non-fasting triglyceride concentrations and ischemic stroke risk. A meta-analysis was performed using ischemic stroke as a primary endpoint.

Results: Twenty-five reports were identified, including 13 prospective cohort and 12 case-control studies. Baseline characteristics, study samples, methods, and primary outcomes varied. Of 13 prospective cohort studies, nine assessed triglyceride concentrations in the fasting state. Seven of these identified triglycerides as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke risk (n = 1624 ischemic cases). Three prospective cohort studies identified a positive association between elevated non-fasting triglyceride concentrations and ischemic stroke risk (n = 2050 ischemic cases). One prospective cohort study that compared fasting and non-fasting triglycerides identified only non-fasting triglycerides as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Of 12 case-control studies identified, five identified a positive relationship between ischemic stroke risk and elevated fasting triglycerides (n = 838 cases). Seven case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis (n = 1996 ischemic stroke cases), revealing an odds ratio of 1.15 (95% CI, 1.08-1.21).

Conclusions: The available data are inconsistent. The relationship between triglyceride levels and ischemic stroke needs further investigation under standardized conditions. We recommend a standardized triglyceride tolerance test to further investigate the associations between fasting versus non-fasting triglyceride levels and ischemic stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus