Limits...
A Truly Broad View of Gene Expression Spotlights Evolution and Diversity

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Because functionally related genes are expected to be coexpressed in different organisms and because the sequence of some of these functionally related genes may also be conserved between organisms, Bergmann and colleagues hypothesized that “conserved coexpression” could serve as an indicator of gene function on a genomic level. (Conserved genes are those that have changed little since they first evolved... Conserved coexpression describes functionally related genes that are activated together in different species.) But first they had to determine whether coexpression was conserved among species... Analyzing the gene expression profiles of six distantly related organisms—bacteria, yeast, plant, worm, fruitfly, and human—the researchers found that functionally related genes were indeed coexpressed in each species... Since functionally related genes are expressed together in different organisms, it would be reasonable to think their regulatory networks are also conserved... To explore this idea, the researchers grouped coexpressed genes and their regulatory elements into “transcription modules” for each organism... They found significant variation in the number, organization, and relative importance of these modular components... Which components contributed most to an organism's global transcription program, for example, depended on the organism... But they also found that the transcription networks are highly clustered—meaning that genes connected to a specific gene are also connected to each other... This modularity supports the notion that variation between and among species arises from the diversity of gene expression programs... Although the regulatory details of individual gene groups varied, the researchers found common ground in the overall landscape of the expression data... And that is what the authors observed: the networks they constructed from the expression data had the expected number of highly connected hub genes, which tend to be essential and conserved among organisms... Since these highly connected genes are likely to have homologues in other organisms, they can serve as powerful and efficient tools for assigning function to the thousands of uncharacterized sequences found in sequence databases.

No MeSH data available.


Regulatory relations among transcription modules
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC300885&req=5

pbio-0020018-g001: Regulatory relations among transcription modules


A Truly Broad View of Gene Expression Spotlights Evolution and Diversity
Regulatory relations among transcription modules
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC300885&req=5

pbio-0020018-g001: Regulatory relations among transcription modules

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Because functionally related genes are expected to be coexpressed in different organisms and because the sequence of some of these functionally related genes may also be conserved between organisms, Bergmann and colleagues hypothesized that “conserved coexpression” could serve as an indicator of gene function on a genomic level. (Conserved genes are those that have changed little since they first evolved... Conserved coexpression describes functionally related genes that are activated together in different species.) But first they had to determine whether coexpression was conserved among species... Analyzing the gene expression profiles of six distantly related organisms—bacteria, yeast, plant, worm, fruitfly, and human—the researchers found that functionally related genes were indeed coexpressed in each species... Since functionally related genes are expressed together in different organisms, it would be reasonable to think their regulatory networks are also conserved... To explore this idea, the researchers grouped coexpressed genes and their regulatory elements into “transcription modules” for each organism... They found significant variation in the number, organization, and relative importance of these modular components... Which components contributed most to an organism's global transcription program, for example, depended on the organism... But they also found that the transcription networks are highly clustered—meaning that genes connected to a specific gene are also connected to each other... This modularity supports the notion that variation between and among species arises from the diversity of gene expression programs... Although the regulatory details of individual gene groups varied, the researchers found common ground in the overall landscape of the expression data... And that is what the authors observed: the networks they constructed from the expression data had the expected number of highly connected hub genes, which tend to be essential and conserved among organisms... Since these highly connected genes are likely to have homologues in other organisms, they can serve as powerful and efficient tools for assigning function to the thousands of uncharacterized sequences found in sequence databases.

No MeSH data available.