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Novel Receptor Guides Germ Cell Transepithelial Migration in Drosophila

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The genes and molecules guiding germ cells' improbable migration through the posterior midgut are not well known... Now Ruth Lehmann and colleagues have identified a novel type of GPCR gene called tre1 that is required for the earliest stage of active germ cell migration—passage through the posterior midgut epithelium... Until now, no mutations had been identified that affected transepithelial migration without disrupting the midgut itself... To identify likely candidates, Lehmann et al. introduced a series of mutations in Drosophila, ranging from overexpression to no expression, and stained the germ cells to observe the mutations' effects on germ cell migration... A laborious series of experiments led the authors to a gene that had a very interesting germ-cell phenotype (the physical effect of the mutation) when misexpressed in these cells... After closer analysis, they discovered that the gene was not normally expressed in germ cells and that loss of gene function had no effect on these cells... Expression pattern studies of tre1 showed that it is expressed in germ cells and that germ cells lacking the Tre1 GPCR display a significant defect in migration... Maternal genes (gene products from the mother that wind up in the embryo) regulate the earliest stages of development, and the researchers conclude that normal germ-cell migration through the posterior midgut—the first active migratory step—depends on maternal tre1 RNA and protein deposited in the germ cells... Lehmann et al. propose that Tre1 functions similarly to related chemokine receptors active during transepithelial migration during an immune response—a process that is not well understood—and that this new group of GPCRs could well control this process, as well as a variety of other migratory functions... If it turns out that these same molecules are also active in cancer—in which invasive migratory behavior leads to tumor cell metastasis—scientists will have a promising lead on finding ways to block their action in targeted therapies... Lehmann et al. hope these results will lay the foundation for such efforts by shedding light on the molecular mechanisms that drive cell migration through tissue.

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Drosophila germ cells migrating through the gut epithelium
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pbio.0000088-g001: Drosophila germ cells migrating through the gut epithelium


Novel Receptor Guides Germ Cell Transepithelial Migration in Drosophila
Drosophila germ cells migrating through the gut epithelium
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC300696&req=5

pbio.0000088-g001: Drosophila germ cells migrating through the gut epithelium

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The genes and molecules guiding germ cells' improbable migration through the posterior midgut are not well known... Now Ruth Lehmann and colleagues have identified a novel type of GPCR gene called tre1 that is required for the earliest stage of active germ cell migration—passage through the posterior midgut epithelium... Until now, no mutations had been identified that affected transepithelial migration without disrupting the midgut itself... To identify likely candidates, Lehmann et al. introduced a series of mutations in Drosophila, ranging from overexpression to no expression, and stained the germ cells to observe the mutations' effects on germ cell migration... A laborious series of experiments led the authors to a gene that had a very interesting germ-cell phenotype (the physical effect of the mutation) when misexpressed in these cells... After closer analysis, they discovered that the gene was not normally expressed in germ cells and that loss of gene function had no effect on these cells... Expression pattern studies of tre1 showed that it is expressed in germ cells and that germ cells lacking the Tre1 GPCR display a significant defect in migration... Maternal genes (gene products from the mother that wind up in the embryo) regulate the earliest stages of development, and the researchers conclude that normal germ-cell migration through the posterior midgut—the first active migratory step—depends on maternal tre1 RNA and protein deposited in the germ cells... Lehmann et al. propose that Tre1 functions similarly to related chemokine receptors active during transepithelial migration during an immune response—a process that is not well understood—and that this new group of GPCRs could well control this process, as well as a variety of other migratory functions... If it turns out that these same molecules are also active in cancer—in which invasive migratory behavior leads to tumor cell metastasis—scientists will have a promising lead on finding ways to block their action in targeted therapies... Lehmann et al. hope these results will lay the foundation for such efforts by shedding light on the molecular mechanisms that drive cell migration through tissue.

No MeSH data available.