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New Microarray Detects Antigen-Specific T Cells and Immune Responses

View Article: PubMed Central

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If a virus, for example, succeeds in duping a cell's molecular machinery into manufacturing new copies of itself, the cell responds by breaking a few of the pathogen's proteins into fragments and displaying some of these peptides (or antigens) on its surface... The detection of “antigen-specific” T cell populations can provide insight into the physiology of the immune system and how it responds appropriately to disease or inappropriately to host proteins in autoimmune disorders... Scientists have linked different T cell responses to specific antigens associated with microbes, autoimmune diseases, allergens, and cancer cells... Faced with the challenge of identifying huge numbers of antigen-specific cells with a wide range of peptide-MHC complexes, Soen et al. turned to the high-throughput technology of microarrays... But instead of using bits of DNA as probes to latch on to active genes in cell samples, the researchers used arrays of peptide-MHC complexes to capture antigen-specific T cells... They printed tiny spots of different peptide-MHC complexes on glass slides and then layered populations of T cells onto the slides, where the T cells could interact with each of the printed peptide-MHC complexes... The rare cells that recognize each specific peptide-MHC complex are captured at the corresponding spot on the microarray, where they can be counted and assayed... To test the reliability of the microarray, the researchers labeled different populations of T lymphocytes based on their antigen-binding specificities and found that the array accurately detected each population... The ability to sort out and assay rare cells that recognize specific antigens will be useful for a wide range of applications, including vaccine development... The researchers also demonstrated the array's sensitivity by successfully detecting a weak, specific immune response in cells extracted from vaccinated mice... Such an application would be a valuable tool for monitoring the global population of T cells in a living organism—including human patients—in response to vaccination, infection, autoimmunity, and other diseases.

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Calcium flux in activated lymphocytes
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pbio.0000076-g001: Calcium flux in activated lymphocytes


New Microarray Detects Antigen-Specific T Cells and Immune Responses
Calcium flux in activated lymphocytes
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC300686&req=5

pbio.0000076-g001: Calcium flux in activated lymphocytes

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

If a virus, for example, succeeds in duping a cell's molecular machinery into manufacturing new copies of itself, the cell responds by breaking a few of the pathogen's proteins into fragments and displaying some of these peptides (or antigens) on its surface... The detection of “antigen-specific” T cell populations can provide insight into the physiology of the immune system and how it responds appropriately to disease or inappropriately to host proteins in autoimmune disorders... Scientists have linked different T cell responses to specific antigens associated with microbes, autoimmune diseases, allergens, and cancer cells... Faced with the challenge of identifying huge numbers of antigen-specific cells with a wide range of peptide-MHC complexes, Soen et al. turned to the high-throughput technology of microarrays... But instead of using bits of DNA as probes to latch on to active genes in cell samples, the researchers used arrays of peptide-MHC complexes to capture antigen-specific T cells... They printed tiny spots of different peptide-MHC complexes on glass slides and then layered populations of T cells onto the slides, where the T cells could interact with each of the printed peptide-MHC complexes... The rare cells that recognize each specific peptide-MHC complex are captured at the corresponding spot on the microarray, where they can be counted and assayed... To test the reliability of the microarray, the researchers labeled different populations of T lymphocytes based on their antigen-binding specificities and found that the array accurately detected each population... The ability to sort out and assay rare cells that recognize specific antigens will be useful for a wide range of applications, including vaccine development... The researchers also demonstrated the array's sensitivity by successfully detecting a weak, specific immune response in cells extracted from vaccinated mice... Such an application would be a valuable tool for monitoring the global population of T cells in a living organism—including human patients—in response to vaccination, infection, autoimmunity, and other diseases.

No MeSH data available.