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Rose-Tinted Ecology

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Rosenzweig spends his first seven chapters winning the reader over with examples of what he terms “reconciliation ecology”:—“sharing our habitats deliberately with other species. ” These are delightfully eclectic, ranging across species and space from coral reef gardening in the Red Sea to the red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) on Florida's Eglin Air Force Base—although the exciting news that Bachman's warblers (Vermivora bachmanii) persist on Eglin (p. 30) is, sadly, extremely unlikely... The remaining five chapters of the book go from the specifics to the generalities; they address the science behind reconciliation ecology... Rosenzweig's argument is a simple one, founded on a huge quantity of empirical and theoretical evidence... These issues notwithstanding, the fundamentals of Rosenzweig's science are rock-solid. “Degrading our environment causes us to expect less of it... But improving our environment will cause us to expect more. ” Rosenzweig concludes by outlining some unresolved questions... Rosenzweig's parting shot presents a clever twist of Daniel Pauly's “shifting baselines” syndrome: “….degrading our environment causes us to expect less of it... Yet just maybe, in spite of these malevolent flies in Rosenzweig's ointment, reconciliation ecology can be extended globally... My hope is that his concluding suggestions show us the way... Those hotspot “kulturmeiders” are exactly the species for which Rosenzweig's argument that we should focus the efforts of reservation ecology is strongest, with reconciliation ecology only coming into play when we're happy that we've bought some time for conservation in these megadiverse tropics... Even now, we can provide Rosenzweig with examples of such tropical reconciliation ecology... The call of the Colombian clergy to substitute cut wax palm (Ceroxylum quindiuense) fronds for seedlings of the same species—for planting as habitat for the Critically Endangered yellow-eared parrot (Ognorhynchus icterotis)—in the annual Semana Santa processions (see www.proaves.org) is a particularly good one... If the global community can be similarly creative, maybe reconciliation ecology does indeed show us the path to a sustainable future... I, for one, truly hope so.

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Rose-Tinted Ecology
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View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Rosenzweig spends his first seven chapters winning the reader over with examples of what he terms “reconciliation ecology”:—“sharing our habitats deliberately with other species. ” These are delightfully eclectic, ranging across species and space from coral reef gardening in the Red Sea to the red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) on Florida's Eglin Air Force Base—although the exciting news that Bachman's warblers (Vermivora bachmanii) persist on Eglin (p. 30) is, sadly, extremely unlikely... The remaining five chapters of the book go from the specifics to the generalities; they address the science behind reconciliation ecology... Rosenzweig's argument is a simple one, founded on a huge quantity of empirical and theoretical evidence... These issues notwithstanding, the fundamentals of Rosenzweig's science are rock-solid. “Degrading our environment causes us to expect less of it... But improving our environment will cause us to expect more. ” Rosenzweig concludes by outlining some unresolved questions... Rosenzweig's parting shot presents a clever twist of Daniel Pauly's “shifting baselines” syndrome: “….degrading our environment causes us to expect less of it... Yet just maybe, in spite of these malevolent flies in Rosenzweig's ointment, reconciliation ecology can be extended globally... My hope is that his concluding suggestions show us the way... Those hotspot “kulturmeiders” are exactly the species for which Rosenzweig's argument that we should focus the efforts of reservation ecology is strongest, with reconciliation ecology only coming into play when we're happy that we've bought some time for conservation in these megadiverse tropics... Even now, we can provide Rosenzweig with examples of such tropical reconciliation ecology... The call of the Colombian clergy to substitute cut wax palm (Ceroxylum quindiuense) fronds for seedlings of the same species—for planting as habitat for the Critically Endangered yellow-eared parrot (Ognorhynchus icterotis)—in the annual Semana Santa processions (see www.proaves.org) is a particularly good one... If the global community can be similarly creative, maybe reconciliation ecology does indeed show us the path to a sustainable future... I, for one, truly hope so.

No MeSH data available.