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Research advocacy: why every scientist should participate.

Marincola E - PLoS Biol. (2003)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: American Society for Cell Biology, USA. emarincola@ascb.org <emarincola@ascb.org>

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Today, political involvement by scientists is widely acknowledged to be vital for the continued health of the biomedical research enterprise... The fundamental issue that never goes away is funding... Congress has been supportive of biomedical research in the last several years: over the course of two administrations and congressional majorities of both parties, leaders have come together to double the budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) over five years, concluding in 2003... A coalition of scientific societies was organized by the American Society for Cell Biology in 1989 under the name of The Joint Steering Committee for Public Policy (JSC)... It was founded by scientists who saw the need to become involved in the political process... Among its activities, the JSC helped Congress launch the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus, which has since grown to become perhaps the most credible caucus in Congress... Among its activities is a highly successful series of briefings that brings research leaders to Capitol Hill to describe the latest advances in biomedical research... Nearly 125 such briefings have been hosted by the caucus since the founding of the JSC... The JSC also founded the Congressional Liaison Committee (CLC) to enable every biomedical scientist to engage in the political process... Chief among them is to ensure a level of NIH funding into the future that maximizes the potential to capitalize on past federal investment in research... Scientists also share responsibility to support continued wise management and priority-setting by NIH leadership: NIH director Elias Zerhouni recently released a plan to support new collaborations and ensure that human benefits are derived from scientific discovery—the result of extended consultation with the scientific community... To that we must add communicating with our members of Congress about the importance of basic biomedical research... As those of us who remember an earlier era of political involvement know, if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.

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Bringing Science to Capitol HillAmerican Society for Cell Biology council in Washington, D.C. (Photo republished with permission from the ASCB Newsletter.)
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pbio.0000071-g001: Bringing Science to Capitol HillAmerican Society for Cell Biology council in Washington, D.C. (Photo republished with permission from the ASCB Newsletter.)


Research advocacy: why every scientist should participate.

Marincola E - PLoS Biol. (2003)

Bringing Science to Capitol HillAmerican Society for Cell Biology council in Washington, D.C. (Photo republished with permission from the ASCB Newsletter.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC300681&req=5

pbio.0000071-g001: Bringing Science to Capitol HillAmerican Society for Cell Biology council in Washington, D.C. (Photo republished with permission from the ASCB Newsletter.)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: American Society for Cell Biology, USA. emarincola@ascb.org <emarincola@ascb.org>

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Today, political involvement by scientists is widely acknowledged to be vital for the continued health of the biomedical research enterprise... The fundamental issue that never goes away is funding... Congress has been supportive of biomedical research in the last several years: over the course of two administrations and congressional majorities of both parties, leaders have come together to double the budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) over five years, concluding in 2003... A coalition of scientific societies was organized by the American Society for Cell Biology in 1989 under the name of The Joint Steering Committee for Public Policy (JSC)... It was founded by scientists who saw the need to become involved in the political process... Among its activities, the JSC helped Congress launch the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus, which has since grown to become perhaps the most credible caucus in Congress... Among its activities is a highly successful series of briefings that brings research leaders to Capitol Hill to describe the latest advances in biomedical research... Nearly 125 such briefings have been hosted by the caucus since the founding of the JSC... The JSC also founded the Congressional Liaison Committee (CLC) to enable every biomedical scientist to engage in the political process... Chief among them is to ensure a level of NIH funding into the future that maximizes the potential to capitalize on past federal investment in research... Scientists also share responsibility to support continued wise management and priority-setting by NIH leadership: NIH director Elias Zerhouni recently released a plan to support new collaborations and ensure that human benefits are derived from scientific discovery—the result of extended consultation with the scientific community... To that we must add communicating with our members of Congress about the importance of basic biomedical research... As those of us who remember an earlier era of political involvement know, if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.

Show MeSH