Limits...
Risk factors for intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair in Ophthalmia Nodosa: a retrospective analysis.

Sengupta S, Reddy PR, Gyatsho J, Ravindran RD, Thiruvengadakrishnan K, Vaidee V - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001).The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022).Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Pondicherry, India. drsunny1980@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report risk factors associated with intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair seen at our institute from January 2005 to December 2007. Records of all patients with caterpillar hair induced ophthalmitis (CHIO) were retrospectively reviewed for clinical characteristics, anatomic location of lodgment of the caterpillar hair, treatment methods, and outcomes. Out of a total of 544 cases of CHIO, 19 eyes (seven in the anterior chamber and 12 in the posterior segment) experienced intraocular penetration (3.5%). The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001). The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022). Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Caterpillar hair at 40× magnification showing spines along the shaft with epithelial debris adherent to the spines
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993991&req=5

Figure 0003: Caterpillar hair at 40× magnification showing spines along the shaft with epithelial debris adherent to the spines

Mentions: Intraocular penetration of hair into the iris, vitreous, and retina were seen at variable intervals ranging from a few days to as long as six months from the initial presentation on the ocular surface. One patient with intravitreal hair developed persistent vitritis and received 4 mg/ 0.1 ml intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) injection to control inflammation at the three-month follow-up. Three patients with retinochoroiditis were well-controlled with a short course of oral steroids. One pediatric patient experienced endophthalmitis with retinal detachment within three weeks, finally resulting in phthisis bulbi. Hair isolated from the conjunctiva was studied randomly under the light microscope, at 40X magnification, in 12 of the cases. Two different varieties were seen, one with spines along the shaft [Fig. 3] and the other without spines [Fig. 4].


Risk factors for intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair in Ophthalmia Nodosa: a retrospective analysis.

Sengupta S, Reddy PR, Gyatsho J, Ravindran RD, Thiruvengadakrishnan K, Vaidee V - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Caterpillar hair at 40× magnification showing spines along the shaft with epithelial debris adherent to the spines
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993991&req=5

Figure 0003: Caterpillar hair at 40× magnification showing spines along the shaft with epithelial debris adherent to the spines
Mentions: Intraocular penetration of hair into the iris, vitreous, and retina were seen at variable intervals ranging from a few days to as long as six months from the initial presentation on the ocular surface. One patient with intravitreal hair developed persistent vitritis and received 4 mg/ 0.1 ml intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) injection to control inflammation at the three-month follow-up. Three patients with retinochoroiditis were well-controlled with a short course of oral steroids. One pediatric patient experienced endophthalmitis with retinal detachment within three weeks, finally resulting in phthisis bulbi. Hair isolated from the conjunctiva was studied randomly under the light microscope, at 40X magnification, in 12 of the cases. Two different varieties were seen, one with spines along the shaft [Fig. 3] and the other without spines [Fig. 4].

Bottom Line: The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001).The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022).Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Pondicherry, India. drsunny1980@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report risk factors associated with intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair seen at our institute from January 2005 to December 2007. Records of all patients with caterpillar hair induced ophthalmitis (CHIO) were retrospectively reviewed for clinical characteristics, anatomic location of lodgment of the caterpillar hair, treatment methods, and outcomes. Out of a total of 544 cases of CHIO, 19 eyes (seven in the anterior chamber and 12 in the posterior segment) experienced intraocular penetration (3.5%). The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001). The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022). Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus