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Risk factors for intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair in Ophthalmia Nodosa: a retrospective analysis.

Sengupta S, Reddy PR, Gyatsho J, Ravindran RD, Thiruvengadakrishnan K, Vaidee V - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001).The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022).Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Pondicherry, India. drsunny1980@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report risk factors associated with intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair seen at our institute from January 2005 to December 2007. Records of all patients with caterpillar hair induced ophthalmitis (CHIO) were retrospectively reviewed for clinical characteristics, anatomic location of lodgment of the caterpillar hair, treatment methods, and outcomes. Out of a total of 544 cases of CHIO, 19 eyes (seven in the anterior chamber and 12 in the posterior segment) experienced intraocular penetration (3.5%). The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001). The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022). Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

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Retained intracorneal setae, tangential to the corneal curvature, with minimal surrounding congestion
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Figure 0002: Retained intracorneal setae, tangential to the corneal curvature, with minimal surrounding congestion

Mentions: Out of the 80 eyes with intracorneal hair at presentation, 19 eyes (23.75%) demonstrated intraocular migration. Presence of intracorneal hair was the only factor that was significantly associated with penetration of hairs (P < 0.001). Successful removal of the hair was possible in only 29 instances (36%), while in the remaining 51 eyes (64%), they were retained [Fig. 2]. Eyes with complete removal of the hair experienced significantly lesser intraocular penetration (6.9%) compared to those eyes in which the hair was retained (33.33%) (P = 0.02). Other risk factors considered for intraocular migration did not reach statistical significance [Table 2].


Risk factors for intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair in Ophthalmia Nodosa: a retrospective analysis.

Sengupta S, Reddy PR, Gyatsho J, Ravindran RD, Thiruvengadakrishnan K, Vaidee V - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Retained intracorneal setae, tangential to the corneal curvature, with minimal surrounding congestion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993991&req=5

Figure 0002: Retained intracorneal setae, tangential to the corneal curvature, with minimal surrounding congestion
Mentions: Out of the 80 eyes with intracorneal hair at presentation, 19 eyes (23.75%) demonstrated intraocular migration. Presence of intracorneal hair was the only factor that was significantly associated with penetration of hairs (P < 0.001). Successful removal of the hair was possible in only 29 instances (36%), while in the remaining 51 eyes (64%), they were retained [Fig. 2]. Eyes with complete removal of the hair experienced significantly lesser intraocular penetration (6.9%) compared to those eyes in which the hair was retained (33.33%) (P = 0.02). Other risk factors considered for intraocular migration did not reach statistical significance [Table 2].

Bottom Line: The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001).The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022).Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Pondicherry, India. drsunny1980@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We report risk factors associated with intraocular penetration of caterpillar hair seen at our institute from January 2005 to December 2007. Records of all patients with caterpillar hair induced ophthalmitis (CHIO) were retrospectively reviewed for clinical characteristics, anatomic location of lodgment of the caterpillar hair, treatment methods, and outcomes. Out of a total of 544 cases of CHIO, 19 eyes (seven in the anterior chamber and 12 in the posterior segment) experienced intraocular penetration (3.5%). The presence of deep intracorneal hair (80 cases, 14.7%) was found to be the only risk factor for intraocular penetration ( P < 0.001). The removal of intracorneal hair was possible in only 29 out of 80 eyes (36%) and this was associated with a significantly reduced risk of intraocular penetration ( P = 0.022). Patients with retained intracorneal hairs should be counseled regarding risk of intraocular penetration and closely followed up for at least six months.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus