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Spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings of acute branch retinal artery occlusion from calcific embolus.

Shah VA, Wallace B, Sabates NR - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: An 82-year-old female presented with sudden painless decrease in vision in the right eye after awakening.She could see the "superior half" of her vision from the right eye only.The high reflectivity of the material and underlying optical shadowing could be characterized as calcific emboli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri Kansas City School of Medicine and Vision Research Center at Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. drvinayshah@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An 82-year-old female presented with sudden painless decrease in vision in the right eye after awakening. She could see the "superior half" of her vision from the right eye only. On examination, best-corrected vision was 20/300 in the right eye and 20/30 in the left eye. The fundus in the right eye revealed recent superotemporal branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) with calcified plaque at the disc. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) (OTI Ophthalmic Technologies, Inc.), revealed hyperreflectivity and increased thickness of the inner retinal layers of the superior compared to the inferior retina. Imaging at the optic disc revealed the blocked artery containing a highly reflective material. The high reflectivity of the material and underlying optical shadowing could be characterized as calcific emboli.

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Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through optic disc revealed blocked artery with highly reflective material and optical shadowing likely due to calcified embolus (black arrow). There are adjacent vessels without blockage (white arrow)
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Figure 0002: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through optic disc revealed blocked artery with highly reflective material and optical shadowing likely due to calcified embolus (black arrow). There are adjacent vessels without blockage (white arrow)

Mentions: Spectral Domain OCT (OCT/SLO, OTI Ophthalmic Technologies Inc, Ontario, Canada) revealed hyperreflectivity and increased thickness of inner retinal layers, and decreased reflectivity in the outer retinal layers, in the superior compared to inferior retina [Fig. 1B]. On optic disc imaging, the spectral domain OCT showed the calcified plaque as an area of high reflectivity within the lumen of the blocked artery with underlying optical shadowing [Fig. 2]. Due to delayed presentation (>24 hours) no treatment was offered. An urgent erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and complete blood count were normal. A repeat echocardiogram and carotid doppler ultrasound were recommended.


Spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings of acute branch retinal artery occlusion from calcific embolus.

Shah VA, Wallace B, Sabates NR - Indian J Ophthalmol (2010 Nov-Dec)

Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through optic disc revealed blocked artery with highly reflective material and optical shadowing likely due to calcified embolus (black arrow). There are adjacent vessels without blockage (white arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993984&req=5

Figure 0002: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography through optic disc revealed blocked artery with highly reflective material and optical shadowing likely due to calcified embolus (black arrow). There are adjacent vessels without blockage (white arrow)
Mentions: Spectral Domain OCT (OCT/SLO, OTI Ophthalmic Technologies Inc, Ontario, Canada) revealed hyperreflectivity and increased thickness of inner retinal layers, and decreased reflectivity in the outer retinal layers, in the superior compared to inferior retina [Fig. 1B]. On optic disc imaging, the spectral domain OCT showed the calcified plaque as an area of high reflectivity within the lumen of the blocked artery with underlying optical shadowing [Fig. 2]. Due to delayed presentation (>24 hours) no treatment was offered. An urgent erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and complete blood count were normal. A repeat echocardiogram and carotid doppler ultrasound were recommended.

Bottom Line: An 82-year-old female presented with sudden painless decrease in vision in the right eye after awakening.She could see the "superior half" of her vision from the right eye only.The high reflectivity of the material and underlying optical shadowing could be characterized as calcific emboli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri Kansas City School of Medicine and Vision Research Center at Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. drvinayshah@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An 82-year-old female presented with sudden painless decrease in vision in the right eye after awakening. She could see the "superior half" of her vision from the right eye only. On examination, best-corrected vision was 20/300 in the right eye and 20/30 in the left eye. The fundus in the right eye revealed recent superotemporal branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) with calcified plaque at the disc. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) (OTI Ophthalmic Technologies, Inc.), revealed hyperreflectivity and increased thickness of the inner retinal layers of the superior compared to the inferior retina. Imaging at the optic disc revealed the blocked artery containing a highly reflective material. The high reflectivity of the material and underlying optical shadowing could be characterized as calcific emboli.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus