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Influenza: a virus of our times.

McCaughey C - Ulster Med J (2010)

Bottom Line: Viruses are successful and omnipresent.Influenza A is a particularly important virus of humans.The article reviews the 2009 emergence of the pandemic influenza A virus, focusing on the potential origin of the virus and the distinctive clinical and epidemiological impact of the 2009 pandemic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Regional Virus Laboratory, Kelvin Building, Royal Hospitals, Belfast BT12 6BA. conall.mccaughey@belfasttrust.hscni.net

ABSTRACT
Viruses are successful and omnipresent. Influenza A is a particularly important virus of humans. The article reviews the 2009 emergence of the pandemic influenza A virus, focusing on the potential origin of the virus and the distinctive clinical and epidemiological impact of the 2009 pandemic.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The structure of an influenza virus
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The structure of an influenza virus

Mentions: Pandemics are a regular occurrence. Historical accounts suggest that there have been more than 20 since the 16th century, typically occurring every 10 to 40 years. The 1918 pandemic (H1N1) is widely regarded as the single biggest natural disaster documented to have affected our species; estimates of mortality range from 10 to 100 million deaths. Notably, over 50% of these deaths were in people under the age of 40. However only the 3 pandemics that happened in the last century and last year's H1N1 2009 pandemic are well characterised in virological and epidemiological terms.


Influenza: a virus of our times.

McCaughey C - Ulster Med J (2010)

The structure of an influenza virus
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993133&req=5

fig1: The structure of an influenza virus
Mentions: Pandemics are a regular occurrence. Historical accounts suggest that there have been more than 20 since the 16th century, typically occurring every 10 to 40 years. The 1918 pandemic (H1N1) is widely regarded as the single biggest natural disaster documented to have affected our species; estimates of mortality range from 10 to 100 million deaths. Notably, over 50% of these deaths were in people under the age of 40. However only the 3 pandemics that happened in the last century and last year's H1N1 2009 pandemic are well characterised in virological and epidemiological terms.

Bottom Line: Viruses are successful and omnipresent.Influenza A is a particularly important virus of humans.The article reviews the 2009 emergence of the pandemic influenza A virus, focusing on the potential origin of the virus and the distinctive clinical and epidemiological impact of the 2009 pandemic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Regional Virus Laboratory, Kelvin Building, Royal Hospitals, Belfast BT12 6BA. conall.mccaughey@belfasttrust.hscni.net

ABSTRACT
Viruses are successful and omnipresent. Influenza A is a particularly important virus of humans. The article reviews the 2009 emergence of the pandemic influenza A virus, focusing on the potential origin of the virus and the distinctive clinical and epidemiological impact of the 2009 pandemic.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus