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Propagation of Blood Function Errors to the Estimates of Kinetic Parameters with Dynamic PET.

Cheng Y, Yetik IŞ - Int J Biomed Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Several methods have been developed, but the effect of accuracy of the estimated blood function on the estimation of the kinetic parameters is not studied.In this paper, we present a method to compute the error in the kinetic parameter estimates caused by the error in the blood input function.Computer simulations show that analytical expressions we derive are sufficiently close to results obtained from numerical methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616-3793, USA.

ABSTRACT
Dynamic PET, in contrast to static PET, can identify temporal variations in the radiotracer concentration. Mathematical modeling of the tissue of interest in dynamic PET can be simplified using compartment models as a linear system where the time activity curve of a specific tissue is the convolution of the tracer concentration in the plasma and the impulse response of the tissue containing kinetic parameters. Since the arterial sampling of blood to acquire the value of tracer concentration is invasive, blind methods to estimate both blood input function and kinetic parameters have recently drawn attention. Several methods have been developed, but the effect of accuracy of the estimated blood function on the estimation of the kinetic parameters is not studied. In this paper, we present a method to compute the error in the kinetic parameter estimates caused by the error in the blood input function. Computer simulations show that analytical expressions we derive are sufficiently close to results obtained from numerical methods. Our findings are important to observe the effect of the blood function on kinetic parameter estimation, but also useful to evaluate various blind methods and observe the dependence of kinetic parameter estimates to certain parts of the blood function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between the estimated k1, k2, k3, and k4 of tumor using the derived expressions and numerical approximation for a range of erroneous blood functions. Top two figures show results when all samples of the blood are erroneous, middle two when the initial peak is erroneous, and the bottom two when the tail part is erroneous.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig7: Comparison between the estimated k1, k2, k3, and k4 of tumor using the derived expressions and numerical approximation for a range of erroneous blood functions. Top two figures show results when all samples of the blood are erroneous, middle two when the initial peak is erroneous, and the bottom two when the tail part is erroneous.

Mentions: Figures 6 and 7 show that the results from the derived expressions are very close to ones obtained from numerical optimization.


Propagation of Blood Function Errors to the Estimates of Kinetic Parameters with Dynamic PET.

Cheng Y, Yetik IŞ - Int J Biomed Imaging (2010)

Comparison between the estimated k1, k2, k3, and k4 of tumor using the derived expressions and numerical approximation for a range of erroneous blood functions. Top two figures show results when all samples of the blood are erroneous, middle two when the initial peak is erroneous, and the bottom two when the tail part is erroneous.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2993041&req=5

fig7: Comparison between the estimated k1, k2, k3, and k4 of tumor using the derived expressions and numerical approximation for a range of erroneous blood functions. Top two figures show results when all samples of the blood are erroneous, middle two when the initial peak is erroneous, and the bottom two when the tail part is erroneous.
Mentions: Figures 6 and 7 show that the results from the derived expressions are very close to ones obtained from numerical optimization.

Bottom Line: Several methods have been developed, but the effect of accuracy of the estimated blood function on the estimation of the kinetic parameters is not studied.In this paper, we present a method to compute the error in the kinetic parameter estimates caused by the error in the blood input function.Computer simulations show that analytical expressions we derive are sufficiently close to results obtained from numerical methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616-3793, USA.

ABSTRACT
Dynamic PET, in contrast to static PET, can identify temporal variations in the radiotracer concentration. Mathematical modeling of the tissue of interest in dynamic PET can be simplified using compartment models as a linear system where the time activity curve of a specific tissue is the convolution of the tracer concentration in the plasma and the impulse response of the tissue containing kinetic parameters. Since the arterial sampling of blood to acquire the value of tracer concentration is invasive, blind methods to estimate both blood input function and kinetic parameters have recently drawn attention. Several methods have been developed, but the effect of accuracy of the estimated blood function on the estimation of the kinetic parameters is not studied. In this paper, we present a method to compute the error in the kinetic parameter estimates caused by the error in the blood input function. Computer simulations show that analytical expressions we derive are sufficiently close to results obtained from numerical methods. Our findings are important to observe the effect of the blood function on kinetic parameter estimation, but also useful to evaluate various blind methods and observe the dependence of kinetic parameter estimates to certain parts of the blood function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus