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Maternal antioxidant supplementation prevents adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed rats.

Sen S, Simmons RA - Diabetes (2010)

Bottom Line: Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth.Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age.Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that maternal obesity increases oxidative stress during fetal development, and to determine whether administration of an antioxidant supplement to pregnant Western diet-fed rats would prevent the development of adiposity in the offspring.

Research design and methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were started on the designated diet at 4 weeks of age. Four groups of animals were studied: control chow (control); control + antioxidants (control+Aox); Western diet (Western); and Western diet + antioxidants (Western+Aox). The rats were mated at 12 to 14 weeks of age, and all pups were weaned onto control diet.

Results: Offspring from dams fed the Western diet had significantly increased adiposity as early as 2 weeks of age as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared with offspring of dams fed a control diet. Inflammation and oxidative stress were increased in preimplantation embryos, fetuses, and newborns of Western diet-fed rats. Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age. The addition of an antioxidant supplement decreased adiposity and normalized glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS; Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play a key role in the development of increased adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed pregnant dams. Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring.

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Weights of female dams in the four study groups. Animals were started on the diets at weaning at 4 weeks of age. The negative numbers refer to weeks before pregnancy, 0 is at breeding, and the positive numbers refer to weeks during pregnancy; n = 10 dams in each group. *P < 0.05 Western and Western+Aox versus control diet.
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Figure 1: Weights of female dams in the four study groups. Animals were started on the diets at weaning at 4 weeks of age. The negative numbers refer to weeks before pregnancy, 0 is at breeding, and the positive numbers refer to weeks during pregnancy; n = 10 dams in each group. *P < 0.05 Western and Western+Aox versus control diet.

Mentions: Body weights at the initiation of the study (at 4 weeks of age) were not different (Fig. 1); however, at the time of breeding, dams fed the Western and the Western+Aox diets were significantly heavier than the two control groups (Fig. 1) and had a significantly higher rate of weight gain and fat mass before pregnancy compared with those fed a control diet (Table 2). Addition of the antioxidant supplement to the Western diet did not significantly affect weight gain or body composition (Table 2). The daily energy intake was increased in dams fed the Western diets; however, there was no difference in food consumption between the four groups, which averaged 5g/100 g body weight daily.


Maternal antioxidant supplementation prevents adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed rats.

Sen S, Simmons RA - Diabetes (2010)

Weights of female dams in the four study groups. Animals were started on the diets at weaning at 4 weeks of age. The negative numbers refer to weeks before pregnancy, 0 is at breeding, and the positive numbers refer to weeks during pregnancy; n = 10 dams in each group. *P < 0.05 Western and Western+Aox versus control diet.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992766&req=5

Figure 1: Weights of female dams in the four study groups. Animals were started on the diets at weaning at 4 weeks of age. The negative numbers refer to weeks before pregnancy, 0 is at breeding, and the positive numbers refer to weeks during pregnancy; n = 10 dams in each group. *P < 0.05 Western and Western+Aox versus control diet.
Mentions: Body weights at the initiation of the study (at 4 weeks of age) were not different (Fig. 1); however, at the time of breeding, dams fed the Western and the Western+Aox diets were significantly heavier than the two control groups (Fig. 1) and had a significantly higher rate of weight gain and fat mass before pregnancy compared with those fed a control diet (Table 2). Addition of the antioxidant supplement to the Western diet did not significantly affect weight gain or body composition (Table 2). The daily energy intake was increased in dams fed the Western diets; however, there was no difference in food consumption between the four groups, which averaged 5g/100 g body weight daily.

Bottom Line: Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth.Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age.Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that maternal obesity increases oxidative stress during fetal development, and to determine whether administration of an antioxidant supplement to pregnant Western diet-fed rats would prevent the development of adiposity in the offspring.

Research design and methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were started on the designated diet at 4 weeks of age. Four groups of animals were studied: control chow (control); control + antioxidants (control+Aox); Western diet (Western); and Western diet + antioxidants (Western+Aox). The rats were mated at 12 to 14 weeks of age, and all pups were weaned onto control diet.

Results: Offspring from dams fed the Western diet had significantly increased adiposity as early as 2 weeks of age as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared with offspring of dams fed a control diet. Inflammation and oxidative stress were increased in preimplantation embryos, fetuses, and newborns of Western diet-fed rats. Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age. The addition of an antioxidant supplement decreased adiposity and normalized glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS; Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play a key role in the development of increased adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed pregnant dams. Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus