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External irradiation models for intracranial 9L glioma studies.

Vinchon-Petit S, Jarnet D, Jadaud E, Feuvret L, Garcion E, Menei P - J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res. (2010)

Bottom Line: Toxicities of reduced weight and alopecia were increased during the radiation period but no serious morbidity or mortality was observed.Moreover, abnormalities disappeared the week following the end of the therapeutic schedule.Delivering 18 Gy in 3 fractions of 6 Gy every 3 days, with mild anaesthesia, is safe, easy to reproduce and allows for standardisation in preclinical studies of different treatment regimens glioma rat model.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM, U646, Université d'Angers, Angers, F-49100, France. skaya2@free.fr

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Radiotherapy has been shown to be an effective for the treatment human glioma and consists of 30 fractions of 2 Gy each for 6-7 weeks in the tumor volume with margins. However. in preclinical studies, many different radiation schedules are used. The main purpose of this work was to review the relevant literature and to propose an external whole-brain irradiation (WBI) protocol for a rat 9L glioma model.

Materials and methods: 9L cells were implanted in the striatum of twenty 344-Fisher rats to induce a brain tumor. On day 8, animals were randomized in two groups: an untreated group and an irradiated group with three fractions of 6 Gy at day 8, 11 and 14. Survival and toxicity were assessed.

Results: Irradiated rats had significantly a longer survival (p = 0.01). No deaths occurred due to the treatment. Toxicities of reduced weight and alopecia were increased during the radiation period but no serious morbidity or mortality was observed. Moreover, abnormalities disappeared the week following the end of the therapeutic schedule.

Conclusions: Delivering 18 Gy in 3 fractions of 6 Gy every 3 days, with mild anaesthesia, is safe, easy to reproduce and allows for standardisation in preclinical studies of different treatment regimens glioma rat model.

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Evolution of the weight median depending on time of observation according to the group.
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Figure 5: Evolution of the weight median depending on time of observation according to the group.

Mentions: No rat, in any group, developed evident behavioural anomalies until approximately four days preceding death. Rats of the 2 groups were either sacrificed at stage 2 to avoid suffering or died spontaneously during the night (n = 8). The others twelve rats were found dead in the morning. There were no issues with wound healing following the procedure. All rats in group B developed incomplete and reversible (WHO grade II) alopecia at the surgical site during radiation therapy. Animals recovered by 21 days following the last day of irradiation. During the radiation therapy (d8-d14), the general behaviour was maintained, with no feeding trouble although the weight increase was slower than observed for rats in group A. For group A, weight gain was typical for twelve week-old rats. The mean increase in weight for the "untreated" group A was 7.69% between d8 and d20 versus 2.47% for the WBI group (figure 5). This difference was significant (p = 0.01). In a previous study (14), mean time of survival of the untreated group was 27.5 days; loss of weight would have been noted for a significant number of rats due to neurological deterioration related to the tumor progression. So, for group A, values of the weight increase after day 20 resulted from an extrapolation starting from the weight increase noted during the first 14 days. Weight gain was no longer significantly different one week after the end of radiation therapy (day 21) (p = 0.25) with an increase of weight estimated at 3.79% for group A and 6% for the group B (figure 5). No other clinical abnormalities due to irradiation were observed.


External irradiation models for intracranial 9L glioma studies.

Vinchon-Petit S, Jarnet D, Jadaud E, Feuvret L, Garcion E, Menei P - J. Exp. Clin. Cancer Res. (2010)

Evolution of the weight median depending on time of observation according to the group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992475&req=5

Figure 5: Evolution of the weight median depending on time of observation according to the group.
Mentions: No rat, in any group, developed evident behavioural anomalies until approximately four days preceding death. Rats of the 2 groups were either sacrificed at stage 2 to avoid suffering or died spontaneously during the night (n = 8). The others twelve rats were found dead in the morning. There were no issues with wound healing following the procedure. All rats in group B developed incomplete and reversible (WHO grade II) alopecia at the surgical site during radiation therapy. Animals recovered by 21 days following the last day of irradiation. During the radiation therapy (d8-d14), the general behaviour was maintained, with no feeding trouble although the weight increase was slower than observed for rats in group A. For group A, weight gain was typical for twelve week-old rats. The mean increase in weight for the "untreated" group A was 7.69% between d8 and d20 versus 2.47% for the WBI group (figure 5). This difference was significant (p = 0.01). In a previous study (14), mean time of survival of the untreated group was 27.5 days; loss of weight would have been noted for a significant number of rats due to neurological deterioration related to the tumor progression. So, for group A, values of the weight increase after day 20 resulted from an extrapolation starting from the weight increase noted during the first 14 days. Weight gain was no longer significantly different one week after the end of radiation therapy (day 21) (p = 0.25) with an increase of weight estimated at 3.79% for group A and 6% for the group B (figure 5). No other clinical abnormalities due to irradiation were observed.

Bottom Line: Toxicities of reduced weight and alopecia were increased during the radiation period but no serious morbidity or mortality was observed.Moreover, abnormalities disappeared the week following the end of the therapeutic schedule.Delivering 18 Gy in 3 fractions of 6 Gy every 3 days, with mild anaesthesia, is safe, easy to reproduce and allows for standardisation in preclinical studies of different treatment regimens glioma rat model.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM, U646, Université d'Angers, Angers, F-49100, France. skaya2@free.fr

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Radiotherapy has been shown to be an effective for the treatment human glioma and consists of 30 fractions of 2 Gy each for 6-7 weeks in the tumor volume with margins. However. in preclinical studies, many different radiation schedules are used. The main purpose of this work was to review the relevant literature and to propose an external whole-brain irradiation (WBI) protocol for a rat 9L glioma model.

Materials and methods: 9L cells were implanted in the striatum of twenty 344-Fisher rats to induce a brain tumor. On day 8, animals were randomized in two groups: an untreated group and an irradiated group with three fractions of 6 Gy at day 8, 11 and 14. Survival and toxicity were assessed.

Results: Irradiated rats had significantly a longer survival (p = 0.01). No deaths occurred due to the treatment. Toxicities of reduced weight and alopecia were increased during the radiation period but no serious morbidity or mortality was observed. Moreover, abnormalities disappeared the week following the end of the therapeutic schedule.

Conclusions: Delivering 18 Gy in 3 fractions of 6 Gy every 3 days, with mild anaesthesia, is safe, easy to reproduce and allows for standardisation in preclinical studies of different treatment regimens glioma rat model.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus