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The use of economic evaluation in CAM: an introductory framework.

Ford E, Solomon D, Adams J, Graves N - BMC Complement Altern Med (2010)

Bottom Line: This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers.Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making.Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Herston Road, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. emily.ford1@uqconnect.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: For CAM to feature prominently in health care decision-making there is a need to expand the evidence-base and to further incorporate economic evaluation into research priorities.In a world of scarce health care resources and an emphasis on efficiency and clinical efficacy, CAM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evaluation to be considered in budget decision-making.

Methods: Economic evaluation provides the tools to measure the costs and health consequences of CAM interventions and thereby inform decision making. This article offers CAM researchers an introductory framework for understanding, undertaking and disseminating economic evaluation. The types of economic evaluation available for the study of CAM are discussed, and decision modelling is introduced as a method for economic evaluation with much potential for use in CAM. Two types of decision models are introduced, decision trees and Markov models, along with a worked example of how each method is used to examine costs and health consequences. This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers.

Conclusions: Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making. Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

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Example of a decision tree.
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Figure 1: Example of a decision tree.

Mentions: A simple decision tree is drawn in Figure 1. This represents a hypothetical case of chronic heart failure and treatment with current therapy and a new therapy comprised of the current treatment, with CAM introduced as a complement. It shows: a decision at the square 'decision node', and this is where a decision to adopt one therapy over the other is summarised; the alternate events that might occur at the circular 'chance nodes', which in this example are improvement or deterioration; and the final cost and health benefits of every possible pathway at the triangular 'terminal nodes'. The expected economic values arising from each decision are the product of the final costs and health benefits and the likelihood of the alternate events, known as probabilities. The tree is rolled back from right to left.


The use of economic evaluation in CAM: an introductory framework.

Ford E, Solomon D, Adams J, Graves N - BMC Complement Altern Med (2010)

Example of a decision tree.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992473&req=5

Figure 1: Example of a decision tree.
Mentions: A simple decision tree is drawn in Figure 1. This represents a hypothetical case of chronic heart failure and treatment with current therapy and a new therapy comprised of the current treatment, with CAM introduced as a complement. It shows: a decision at the square 'decision node', and this is where a decision to adopt one therapy over the other is summarised; the alternate events that might occur at the circular 'chance nodes', which in this example are improvement or deterioration; and the final cost and health benefits of every possible pathway at the triangular 'terminal nodes'. The expected economic values arising from each decision are the product of the final costs and health benefits and the likelihood of the alternate events, known as probabilities. The tree is rolled back from right to left.

Bottom Line: This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers.Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making.Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Herston Road, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. emily.ford1@uqconnect.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: For CAM to feature prominently in health care decision-making there is a need to expand the evidence-base and to further incorporate economic evaluation into research priorities.In a world of scarce health care resources and an emphasis on efficiency and clinical efficacy, CAM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evaluation to be considered in budget decision-making.

Methods: Economic evaluation provides the tools to measure the costs and health consequences of CAM interventions and thereby inform decision making. This article offers CAM researchers an introductory framework for understanding, undertaking and disseminating economic evaluation. The types of economic evaluation available for the study of CAM are discussed, and decision modelling is introduced as a method for economic evaluation with much potential for use in CAM. Two types of decision models are introduced, decision trees and Markov models, along with a worked example of how each method is used to examine costs and health consequences. This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers.

Conclusions: Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making. Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

Show MeSH