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Modulation of temporal precision in thalamic population responses to natural visual stimuli.

Desbordes G, Jin J, Alonso JM, Stanley GB - Front Syst Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: In response to natural scene stimuli, neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are temporally precise - on a time scale of 10-25 ms - both within single cells and across cells within a population.This time scale, established by non stimulus-driven elements of neuronal firing, is significantly shorter than that of natural scenes, yet is critical for the neural representation of the spatial and temporal structure of the scene.Given the sensitivity of the thalamocortical synapse to closely timed spikes and the importance of fine timing precision for the faithful representation of natural scenes, the modulation of thalamic population timing over these time scales is likely important for cortical representations of the dynamic natural visual environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University Atlanta, GA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Natural visual stimuli have highly structured spatial and temporal properties which influence the way visual information is encoded in the visual pathway. In response to natural scene stimuli, neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are temporally precise - on a time scale of 10-25 ms - both within single cells and across cells within a population. This time scale, established by non stimulus-driven elements of neuronal firing, is significantly shorter than that of natural scenes, yet is critical for the neural representation of the spatial and temporal structure of the scene. Here, a generalized linear model (GLM) that combines stimulus-driven elements with spike-history dependence associated with intrinsic cellular dynamics is shown to predict the fine timing precision of LGN responses to natural scene stimuli, the corresponding correlation structure across nearby neurons in the population, and the continuous modulation of spike timing precision and latency across neurons. A single model captured the experimentally observed neural response, across different levels of contrasts and different classes of visual stimuli, through interactions between the stimulus correlation structure and the nonlinearity in spike generation and spike history dependence. Given the sensitivity of the thalamocortical synapse to closely timed spikes and the importance of fine timing precision for the faithful representation of natural scenes, the modulation of thalamic population timing over these time scales is likely important for cortical representations of the dynamic natural visual environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three examples of events shared across two cells for which 120 repeats are sufficient to measure the width of the local cross-correlation. Experimental measurements for three different events recorded in three different pairs of cells. Superimposed in green are the predictions of the GLM model for 10,000 repeats simulating the same three pairs at those particular events.
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Figure 9: Three examples of events shared across two cells for which 120 repeats are sufficient to measure the width of the local cross-correlation. Experimental measurements for three different events recorded in three different pairs of cells. Superimposed in green are the predictions of the GLM model for 10,000 repeats simulating the same three pairs at those particular events.

Mentions: The reliable estimation of temporally localized correlation structure requires a very large number of spikes, often unattainable experimentally. For a small number of events, however, the localized cross-correlation could be measured in the experimental data, and was reliably predicted by the GLM (Figure 9). Given the ability of the GLM to predict local cross-correlations for these examples and to predict the activity of each neuron individually, we used the GLM to generate spike trains from each cell in response to 10,000 repetitions of the visual stimulus (see Methods), a number largely sufficient to yield smooth estimates of the local cross-correlation between cells on an event-by-event basis, over all events shared by a pair of cells.


Modulation of temporal precision in thalamic population responses to natural visual stimuli.

Desbordes G, Jin J, Alonso JM, Stanley GB - Front Syst Neurosci (2010)

Three examples of events shared across two cells for which 120 repeats are sufficient to measure the width of the local cross-correlation. Experimental measurements for three different events recorded in three different pairs of cells. Superimposed in green are the predictions of the GLM model for 10,000 repeats simulating the same three pairs at those particular events.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992450&req=5

Figure 9: Three examples of events shared across two cells for which 120 repeats are sufficient to measure the width of the local cross-correlation. Experimental measurements for three different events recorded in three different pairs of cells. Superimposed in green are the predictions of the GLM model for 10,000 repeats simulating the same three pairs at those particular events.
Mentions: The reliable estimation of temporally localized correlation structure requires a very large number of spikes, often unattainable experimentally. For a small number of events, however, the localized cross-correlation could be measured in the experimental data, and was reliably predicted by the GLM (Figure 9). Given the ability of the GLM to predict local cross-correlations for these examples and to predict the activity of each neuron individually, we used the GLM to generate spike trains from each cell in response to 10,000 repetitions of the visual stimulus (see Methods), a number largely sufficient to yield smooth estimates of the local cross-correlation between cells on an event-by-event basis, over all events shared by a pair of cells.

Bottom Line: In response to natural scene stimuli, neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are temporally precise - on a time scale of 10-25 ms - both within single cells and across cells within a population.This time scale, established by non stimulus-driven elements of neuronal firing, is significantly shorter than that of natural scenes, yet is critical for the neural representation of the spatial and temporal structure of the scene.Given the sensitivity of the thalamocortical synapse to closely timed spikes and the importance of fine timing precision for the faithful representation of natural scenes, the modulation of thalamic population timing over these time scales is likely important for cortical representations of the dynamic natural visual environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University Atlanta, GA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Natural visual stimuli have highly structured spatial and temporal properties which influence the way visual information is encoded in the visual pathway. In response to natural scene stimuli, neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are temporally precise - on a time scale of 10-25 ms - both within single cells and across cells within a population. This time scale, established by non stimulus-driven elements of neuronal firing, is significantly shorter than that of natural scenes, yet is critical for the neural representation of the spatial and temporal structure of the scene. Here, a generalized linear model (GLM) that combines stimulus-driven elements with spike-history dependence associated with intrinsic cellular dynamics is shown to predict the fine timing precision of LGN responses to natural scene stimuli, the corresponding correlation structure across nearby neurons in the population, and the continuous modulation of spike timing precision and latency across neurons. A single model captured the experimentally observed neural response, across different levels of contrasts and different classes of visual stimuli, through interactions between the stimulus correlation structure and the nonlinearity in spike generation and spike history dependence. Given the sensitivity of the thalamocortical synapse to closely timed spikes and the importance of fine timing precision for the faithful representation of natural scenes, the modulation of thalamic population timing over these time scales is likely important for cortical representations of the dynamic natural visual environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus