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Antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the diabetes prevention program and diabetes prevention program outcomes study.

Rubin RR, Ma Y, Peyrot M, Marrero DG, Price DW, Barrett-Connor E, Knowler WC, Diabetes Prevention Program Research Gro - Diabetes Care (2010)

Bottom Line: Controlled for factors associated with diabetes risk, continuous antidepressant use compared with no use was associated with diabetes risk in the placebo (adjusted hazard ratio 2.34 [95% CI 1.32-4.15]) and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45-4.22]) arms, but not in the metformin arm (0.55 [0.25-1.19]).Continuous antidepressant use was significantly associated with diabetes risk in the placebo and lifestyle arms.Measured confounders and mediators did not account for this association, which could represent a drug effect or reflect differences not assessed in this study between antidepressant users and nonusers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. dppmail@biostat.bsc.gwu.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the association between antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS).

Research design and methods: DPP/DPPOS participants were assessed for diabetes every 6 months and for antidepressant use every 3 months in DPP and every 6 months in DPPOS for a median 10.0-year follow-up.

Results: Controlled for factors associated with diabetes risk, continuous antidepressant use compared with no use was associated with diabetes risk in the placebo (adjusted hazard ratio 2.34 [95% CI 1.32-4.15]) and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45-4.22]) arms, but not in the metformin arm (0.55 [0.25-1.19]).

Conclusions: Continuous antidepressant use was significantly associated with diabetes risk in the placebo and lifestyle arms. Measured confounders and mediators did not account for this association, which could represent a drug effect or reflect differences not assessed in this study between antidepressant users and nonusers.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

For each treatment group, from left to right, the three bars represent no exposure, intermittent exposure, and continuous exposure. The error bars represent 95% CIs for the point estimates.
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Figure 1: For each treatment group, from left to right, the three bars represent no exposure, intermittent exposure, and continuous exposure. The error bars represent 95% CIs for the point estimates.

Mentions: When other factors associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes were controlled, continuous ADM use during the DPP/DPPOS (compared with no use) was strongly associated with diabetes risk (Fig. 1) for participants in the placebo (HRa 2.34 [95% CI 1.32–4.15] and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45–4.22]) arms. In the placebo arm, the association between intermittent ADM use and diabetes trended toward statistical significance (1.34 [0.99–1.81]). In the metformin arm, ADM use was not associated with diabetes risk (0.55 [0.25–1.19]). There was a significant difference between the lifestyle and metformin arms in the association between ADM and diabetes risk. Results did not change when we excluded participants taking ADMs that are more likely to cause weight gain (tricyclic and tetracyclic agents).


Antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the diabetes prevention program and diabetes prevention program outcomes study.

Rubin RR, Ma Y, Peyrot M, Marrero DG, Price DW, Barrett-Connor E, Knowler WC, Diabetes Prevention Program Research Gro - Diabetes Care (2010)

For each treatment group, from left to right, the three bars represent no exposure, intermittent exposure, and continuous exposure. The error bars represent 95% CIs for the point estimates.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992187&req=5

Figure 1: For each treatment group, from left to right, the three bars represent no exposure, intermittent exposure, and continuous exposure. The error bars represent 95% CIs for the point estimates.
Mentions: When other factors associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes were controlled, continuous ADM use during the DPP/DPPOS (compared with no use) was strongly associated with diabetes risk (Fig. 1) for participants in the placebo (HRa 2.34 [95% CI 1.32–4.15] and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45–4.22]) arms. In the placebo arm, the association between intermittent ADM use and diabetes trended toward statistical significance (1.34 [0.99–1.81]). In the metformin arm, ADM use was not associated with diabetes risk (0.55 [0.25–1.19]). There was a significant difference between the lifestyle and metformin arms in the association between ADM and diabetes risk. Results did not change when we excluded participants taking ADMs that are more likely to cause weight gain (tricyclic and tetracyclic agents).

Bottom Line: Controlled for factors associated with diabetes risk, continuous antidepressant use compared with no use was associated with diabetes risk in the placebo (adjusted hazard ratio 2.34 [95% CI 1.32-4.15]) and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45-4.22]) arms, but not in the metformin arm (0.55 [0.25-1.19]).Continuous antidepressant use was significantly associated with diabetes risk in the placebo and lifestyle arms.Measured confounders and mediators did not account for this association, which could represent a drug effect or reflect differences not assessed in this study between antidepressant users and nonusers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. dppmail@biostat.bsc.gwu.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the association between antidepressant medicine use and risk of developing diabetes during the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS).

Research design and methods: DPP/DPPOS participants were assessed for diabetes every 6 months and for antidepressant use every 3 months in DPP and every 6 months in DPPOS for a median 10.0-year follow-up.

Results: Controlled for factors associated with diabetes risk, continuous antidepressant use compared with no use was associated with diabetes risk in the placebo (adjusted hazard ratio 2.34 [95% CI 1.32-4.15]) and lifestyle (2.48 [1.45-4.22]) arms, but not in the metformin arm (0.55 [0.25-1.19]).

Conclusions: Continuous antidepressant use was significantly associated with diabetes risk in the placebo and lifestyle arms. Measured confounders and mediators did not account for this association, which could represent a drug effect or reflect differences not assessed in this study between antidepressant users and nonusers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus