Limits...
Role of Scheimpflug imaging in the diagnosis and management of keratitis caused by caterpillar seta.

Timucin OB, Baykara M - Oman J Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: Corneal infiltration was imaged as a hyper-reflective area.Lesion dimensions were measured with calipers.Scheimpflug imaging is a potential tool for localization of corneal lesions, monitoring the progress of the injury and evaluating the treatment response objectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Van Education and Research Hospital, Van/Turkey.

ABSTRACT
A 16-year-old boy presented with a history of an accidental hit to the left eye by a butterfly (Lepidoptera). One seta fragment was found to be embedded into the cornea and inflammation secondary to penetration of caterpillar seta was seen around the seta fragment. Scheimpflug imaging was performed in the area showing caterpillar seta. Corneal infiltration was imaged as a hyper-reflective area. Lesion dimensions were measured with calipers. Scheimpflug imaging is a potential tool for localization of corneal lesions, monitoring the progress of the injury and evaluating the treatment response objectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Slit-lamp photograph of left eye showing caterpillar seta (arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992165&req=5

Figure 0002: Slit-lamp photograph of left eye showing caterpillar seta (arrow)

Mentions: A 16-year-old boy presented with a history of an accidental hit to the left eye by a butterfly (Lepidoptera) while driving a bicycle, following which he started having conjunctival injection. He was referred to us after 15 days of follow-up by a local ophthalmologist because of persistent conjunctival injection and foreign body sensation. His chief complaint was foreign body sensation. Visual acuity was 20/20 in the affected eye. On slit-lamp examination, the anterior chamber had no cellular reaction and funduscopic examination was unremarkable. Intraocular pressure was 16 mm-Hg by applanation. One seta fragment was found to be embedded into the cornea and inflammation secondary to penetration by the caterpillar seta was seen around the seta fragment [Figure 2]. The epithelium was intact with negative fluorescein staining. Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam 70700: Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany) showed a single, high-reflective site, suggestive of the caterpillar seta in the superficial cornea at 10:00 o’clock position, irregular stroma and interrupted endothelial surface integrity [Figures 3a and b]. There was also localized corneal thickening in this region [Figures 3a and b]. Exposed foreign body was removed with a forceps and identified as seta. After removal of the seta under a microscope, the inflammation subsided. Initial Scheimpflug imaging showed that the infiltrate was 1110 μm in width and 180 μm in depth [Figure 3a]. The patient was then prescribed topical ciprofloxacin and fluorometholone eye drops four times daily, which was then tapered gradually over the next two weeks. One week later, the conjunctival injection was reduced. On Scheimpflug imaging, the dimension of the corneal lesion was reduced to 528 μm in width and 147 μm in depth [Figure 3c]. Twelve days later, the infiltration had healed completely and resolved without scarring. At follow-up, Scheimpflug imaging showed that the superficial high reflective site disappeared, the stroma had gained its regularity and the integrity of corneal endothelial surface was visible [Figure 3d]. The eye was free of inflammation at three weeks’ follow-up.


Role of Scheimpflug imaging in the diagnosis and management of keratitis caused by caterpillar seta.

Timucin OB, Baykara M - Oman J Ophthalmol (2010)

Slit-lamp photograph of left eye showing caterpillar seta (arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992165&req=5

Figure 0002: Slit-lamp photograph of left eye showing caterpillar seta (arrow)
Mentions: A 16-year-old boy presented with a history of an accidental hit to the left eye by a butterfly (Lepidoptera) while driving a bicycle, following which he started having conjunctival injection. He was referred to us after 15 days of follow-up by a local ophthalmologist because of persistent conjunctival injection and foreign body sensation. His chief complaint was foreign body sensation. Visual acuity was 20/20 in the affected eye. On slit-lamp examination, the anterior chamber had no cellular reaction and funduscopic examination was unremarkable. Intraocular pressure was 16 mm-Hg by applanation. One seta fragment was found to be embedded into the cornea and inflammation secondary to penetration by the caterpillar seta was seen around the seta fragment [Figure 2]. The epithelium was intact with negative fluorescein staining. Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam 70700: Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany) showed a single, high-reflective site, suggestive of the caterpillar seta in the superficial cornea at 10:00 o’clock position, irregular stroma and interrupted endothelial surface integrity [Figures 3a and b]. There was also localized corneal thickening in this region [Figures 3a and b]. Exposed foreign body was removed with a forceps and identified as seta. After removal of the seta under a microscope, the inflammation subsided. Initial Scheimpflug imaging showed that the infiltrate was 1110 μm in width and 180 μm in depth [Figure 3a]. The patient was then prescribed topical ciprofloxacin and fluorometholone eye drops four times daily, which was then tapered gradually over the next two weeks. One week later, the conjunctival injection was reduced. On Scheimpflug imaging, the dimension of the corneal lesion was reduced to 528 μm in width and 147 μm in depth [Figure 3c]. Twelve days later, the infiltration had healed completely and resolved without scarring. At follow-up, Scheimpflug imaging showed that the superficial high reflective site disappeared, the stroma had gained its regularity and the integrity of corneal endothelial surface was visible [Figure 3d]. The eye was free of inflammation at three weeks’ follow-up.

Bottom Line: Corneal infiltration was imaged as a hyper-reflective area.Lesion dimensions were measured with calipers.Scheimpflug imaging is a potential tool for localization of corneal lesions, monitoring the progress of the injury and evaluating the treatment response objectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Van Education and Research Hospital, Van/Turkey.

ABSTRACT
A 16-year-old boy presented with a history of an accidental hit to the left eye by a butterfly (Lepidoptera). One seta fragment was found to be embedded into the cornea and inflammation secondary to penetration of caterpillar seta was seen around the seta fragment. Scheimpflug imaging was performed in the area showing caterpillar seta. Corneal infiltration was imaged as a hyper-reflective area. Lesion dimensions were measured with calipers. Scheimpflug imaging is a potential tool for localization of corneal lesions, monitoring the progress of the injury and evaluating the treatment response objectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus