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Population structure of the predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi in a tea field based on an analysis of microsatellite DNA markers.

Hinomoto N, Todokoro Y, Higaki T - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2010)

Bottom Line: The fixation indexes F (ST) among subpopulations were not significantly different.The kinship coefficients between individuals did not differ significantly within a site as a function of the sampling dates, but the coefficients gradually decreased with increasing distance.Given the previously observed population dynamics of N. womersleyi, it appears that the area inhabited by a given cluster of the mite did not exceed 100 m.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Natural Enemies Laboratory, Insect Interaction Research Unit, Division of Insect Sciences, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8634, Japan. hinomoto@affrc.go.jp

ABSTRACT
The predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi (Schicha) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an important natural enemy of the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawaki Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), in tea fields. Attraction and preservation of natural enemies by habitat management to reduce the need for acaricide sprays is thought to enhance the activity of N. womersleyi. To better conserve N. womersleyi in the field, however, it is essential to elucidate the population genetic structure of this species. To this end, we developed ten microsatellite DNA markers for N. womersleyi. We then evaluated population structure of N. womersleyi collected from a tea field, where Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia (Mill.), was planted to preserve N. womersleyi. Seventy-seven adult females were collected from four sites within 200 m. The fixation indexes F (ST) among subpopulations were not significantly different. The kinship coefficients between individuals did not differ significantly within a site as a function of the sampling dates, but the coefficients gradually decreased with increasing distance. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed that the population consisted of three genetic clusters, and that subpopulations within 100 m, including those collected on T. rotundifolia, were genetically similar to each other. Given the previously observed population dynamics of N. womersleyi, it appears that the area inhabited by a given cluster of the mite did not exceed 100 m. The estimation of population structure using microsatellite markers will provide valuable information in conservation biological control.

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Neighbour–joining tree for seven subpopulations of Neoseiulus womersleyi collected in the tea field based on the Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ (1967) chord distance (Dc). Numbers are bootstrap support indices on loci (left) and on individuals (right), respectively
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Fig4: Neighbour–joining tree for seven subpopulations of Neoseiulus womersleyi collected in the tea field based on the Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ (1967) chord distance (Dc). Numbers are bootstrap support indices on loci (left) and on individuals (right), respectively

Mentions: To detect subpopulation differentiation statistically, the fixation indexes FST among subpopulation were calculated (Table 5). No significant differentiation among subpopulations was found, suggesting the differentiation among subpopulations was very low. However, neighbour-joining tree constracted based on Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ distance supported that genetic similarity between subpopulations A1 and A2 (Fig. 4), showing mites collected on site A were remarkably characteristics. Subpopulations B1 and T1, and C1 and T2, were also similar, suggesting that gene flow among these three sites occurred.Table 5


Population structure of the predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi in a tea field based on an analysis of microsatellite DNA markers.

Hinomoto N, Todokoro Y, Higaki T - Exp. Appl. Acarol. (2010)

Neighbour–joining tree for seven subpopulations of Neoseiulus womersleyi collected in the tea field based on the Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ (1967) chord distance (Dc). Numbers are bootstrap support indices on loci (left) and on individuals (right), respectively
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2992129&req=5

Fig4: Neighbour–joining tree for seven subpopulations of Neoseiulus womersleyi collected in the tea field based on the Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ (1967) chord distance (Dc). Numbers are bootstrap support indices on loci (left) and on individuals (right), respectively
Mentions: To detect subpopulation differentiation statistically, the fixation indexes FST among subpopulation were calculated (Table 5). No significant differentiation among subpopulations was found, suggesting the differentiation among subpopulations was very low. However, neighbour-joining tree constracted based on Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ distance supported that genetic similarity between subpopulations A1 and A2 (Fig. 4), showing mites collected on site A were remarkably characteristics. Subpopulations B1 and T1, and C1 and T2, were also similar, suggesting that gene flow among these three sites occurred.Table 5

Bottom Line: The fixation indexes F (ST) among subpopulations were not significantly different.The kinship coefficients between individuals did not differ significantly within a site as a function of the sampling dates, but the coefficients gradually decreased with increasing distance.Given the previously observed population dynamics of N. womersleyi, it appears that the area inhabited by a given cluster of the mite did not exceed 100 m.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Natural Enemies Laboratory, Insect Interaction Research Unit, Division of Insect Sciences, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8634, Japan. hinomoto@affrc.go.jp

ABSTRACT
The predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi (Schicha) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an important natural enemy of the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawaki Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), in tea fields. Attraction and preservation of natural enemies by habitat management to reduce the need for acaricide sprays is thought to enhance the activity of N. womersleyi. To better conserve N. womersleyi in the field, however, it is essential to elucidate the population genetic structure of this species. To this end, we developed ten microsatellite DNA markers for N. womersleyi. We then evaluated population structure of N. womersleyi collected from a tea field, where Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia (Mill.), was planted to preserve N. womersleyi. Seventy-seven adult females were collected from four sites within 200 m. The fixation indexes F (ST) among subpopulations were not significantly different. The kinship coefficients between individuals did not differ significantly within a site as a function of the sampling dates, but the coefficients gradually decreased with increasing distance. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed that the population consisted of three genetic clusters, and that subpopulations within 100 m, including those collected on T. rotundifolia, were genetically similar to each other. Given the previously observed population dynamics of N. womersleyi, it appears that the area inhabited by a given cluster of the mite did not exceed 100 m. The estimation of population structure using microsatellite markers will provide valuable information in conservation biological control.

Show MeSH