Limits...
Prediction of ESRD and death among people with CKD: the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) prospective cohort study.

Landray MJ, Emberson JR, Blackwell L, Dasgupta T, Zakeri R, Morgan MD, Ferro CJ, Vickery S, Ayrton P, Nair D, Dalton RN, Lamb EJ, Baigent C, Townend JN, Wheeler DC - Am. J. Kidney Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: For death, age, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, troponin T level, and cigarette smoking remained strongly predictive of risk.Other important factors may have been missed because of limited study power.Larger cohort studies are required to further validate these results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. martin.landray@ctsu.ox.ac.uk

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Time to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) Study, by initial chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage. The P value for the log-rank test corresponds to the test of equal survival across all 3 baseline CKD groups. CKD stage was as defined by the National Kidney Foundation's K/DOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) Work Group in 2002: stage 3, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2; stage 4, eGFR of 15-30 mL/min/1.73 m2; and stage 5, eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2. eGFR was calculated using the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Individuals receiving renal replacement therapy at baseline (either dialysis or a kidney transplant) were excluded from the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991589&req=5

fig1: Time to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) Study, by initial chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage. The P value for the log-rank test corresponds to the test of equal survival across all 3 baseline CKD groups. CKD stage was as defined by the National Kidney Foundation's K/DOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) Work Group in 2002: stage 3, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2; stage 4, eGFR of 15-30 mL/min/1.73 m2; and stage 5, eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2. eGFR was calculated using the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Individuals receiving renal replacement therapy at baseline (either dialysis or a kidney transplant) were excluded from the study.

Mentions: During a mean of 4.1 years' (1,571 person-years) follow-up for renal events, 190 participants reached ESRD (mean rate, 12.1% per annum [pa]; Table 3). In participants initially at CKD stages 3, 4, and 5, annual event rates of ESRD were 1.6%, 9.6%, and 58.2%, respectively (between-group comparison, P < 0.001; Fig 1). No patients with stage 3 CKD at baseline required dialysis or transplant within the first 4 years of follow-up. In those with stage 4 CKD initially, median time to ESRD was about 5 years longer than for those with stage 5 CKD (∼6 vs 1 year, respectively; Fig 1).


Prediction of ESRD and death among people with CKD: the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) prospective cohort study.

Landray MJ, Emberson JR, Blackwell L, Dasgupta T, Zakeri R, Morgan MD, Ferro CJ, Vickery S, Ayrton P, Nair D, Dalton RN, Lamb EJ, Baigent C, Townend JN, Wheeler DC - Am. J. Kidney Dis. (2010)

Time to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) Study, by initial chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage. The P value for the log-rank test corresponds to the test of equal survival across all 3 baseline CKD groups. CKD stage was as defined by the National Kidney Foundation's K/DOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) Work Group in 2002: stage 3, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2; stage 4, eGFR of 15-30 mL/min/1.73 m2; and stage 5, eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2. eGFR was calculated using the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Individuals receiving renal replacement therapy at baseline (either dialysis or a kidney transplant) were excluded from the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991589&req=5

fig1: Time to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in the Chronic Renal Impairment in Birmingham (CRIB) Study, by initial chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage. The P value for the log-rank test corresponds to the test of equal survival across all 3 baseline CKD groups. CKD stage was as defined by the National Kidney Foundation's K/DOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) Work Group in 2002: stage 3, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2; stage 4, eGFR of 15-30 mL/min/1.73 m2; and stage 5, eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2. eGFR was calculated using the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Individuals receiving renal replacement therapy at baseline (either dialysis or a kidney transplant) were excluded from the study.
Mentions: During a mean of 4.1 years' (1,571 person-years) follow-up for renal events, 190 participants reached ESRD (mean rate, 12.1% per annum [pa]; Table 3). In participants initially at CKD stages 3, 4, and 5, annual event rates of ESRD were 1.6%, 9.6%, and 58.2%, respectively (between-group comparison, P < 0.001; Fig 1). No patients with stage 3 CKD at baseline required dialysis or transplant within the first 4 years of follow-up. In those with stage 4 CKD initially, median time to ESRD was about 5 years longer than for those with stage 5 CKD (∼6 vs 1 year, respectively; Fig 1).

Bottom Line: For death, age, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, troponin T level, and cigarette smoking remained strongly predictive of risk.Other important factors may have been missed because of limited study power.Larger cohort studies are required to further validate these results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. martin.landray@ctsu.ox.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus