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Comparison of Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Outcomes between Ureteroscopy and Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Proximal Ureteral Stones.

Lee JH, Woo SH, Kim ET, Kim DK, Park J - Korean J Urol (2010)

Bottom Line: Overall satisfaction and voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status showed no significant difference between the groups.Subanalysis showed that the satisfaction rate of the URS group with stone-free status was significantly lower than that of the SWL group in patients with ≥10 mm stones (p=0.032).Overall treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between SWL and URS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Eulji University Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We examined patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopic removal of stone (URS) for proximal ureteral stones.

Materials and methods: We evaluated 224 consecutive patients who underwent SWL (n=156) or URS (n=68) for a single radiopaque proximal ureteral stone. Stone-free rates, defined as no visible fragment on a plain X-ray; complications; and patient satisfaction were compared. Patient satisfaction was examined through a specifically tailored questionnaire that included overall satisfaction (5 scales) and 4 domains (pain, voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status).

Results: The stone-free rates after the first, second, and third sessions of SWL were 36.5%, 65.4%, and 84.6%, respectively. The overall stone-free rate of URS was 82.4%, which was comparable to that of the third session of SWL. Complications were similar between the two groups except for greater steinstrasse in the SWL group. Overall satisfaction and voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status showed no significant difference between the groups. In the pain domain, the SWL group had a relatively lower satisfaction rate than did the URS group (p=0.05). Subanalysis showed that the satisfaction rate of the URS group with stone-free status was significantly lower than that of the SWL group in patients with ≥10 mm stones (p=0.032).

Conclusions: Overall treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between SWL and URS. However, patients undergoing URS for ≥10 mm proximal ureteral stones had lesser satisfaction with stone-free status, because of relatively lower stone-free rates due to upward stone migration. We suggest that factors regarding the subjective satisfaction of patients be included in counseling about treatment options for proximal ureteral stones.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall satisfaction according to treatment method. SWL: shock wave lithotripsy, URS: ureteroscopic removal of stone.
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Figure 1: Overall satisfaction according to treatment method. SWL: shock wave lithotripsy, URS: ureteroscopic removal of stone.

Mentions: Overall satisfaction was similar between the two groups (Fig. 1). Proportions of 'very satisfied' patients were 40% and 42% of the SWL and URS groups. The overall satisfaction score was also similar between the two groups (Mean±SD, 4.03±0.99 vs. 4.07±1.01; p=0.811). Similarly, subgroup analysis in patients with <10 mm vs. ≥10 mm stones showed comparable overall satisfaction in the two groups (Fig. 2). Mean satisfaction scores±SD in the SWL and URS groups were 4.00±1.01 vs. 4.20±0.89 for <10 mm stones (p=0.205) and 4.18±0.92 vs. 3.75±1.20 for ≥10 mm stones, respectively (p=0.187).


Comparison of Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Outcomes between Ureteroscopy and Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Proximal Ureteral Stones.

Lee JH, Woo SH, Kim ET, Kim DK, Park J - Korean J Urol (2010)

Overall satisfaction according to treatment method. SWL: shock wave lithotripsy, URS: ureteroscopic removal of stone.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991578&req=5

Figure 1: Overall satisfaction according to treatment method. SWL: shock wave lithotripsy, URS: ureteroscopic removal of stone.
Mentions: Overall satisfaction was similar between the two groups (Fig. 1). Proportions of 'very satisfied' patients were 40% and 42% of the SWL and URS groups. The overall satisfaction score was also similar between the two groups (Mean±SD, 4.03±0.99 vs. 4.07±1.01; p=0.811). Similarly, subgroup analysis in patients with <10 mm vs. ≥10 mm stones showed comparable overall satisfaction in the two groups (Fig. 2). Mean satisfaction scores±SD in the SWL and URS groups were 4.00±1.01 vs. 4.20±0.89 for <10 mm stones (p=0.205) and 4.18±0.92 vs. 3.75±1.20 for ≥10 mm stones, respectively (p=0.187).

Bottom Line: Overall satisfaction and voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status showed no significant difference between the groups.Subanalysis showed that the satisfaction rate of the URS group with stone-free status was significantly lower than that of the SWL group in patients with ≥10 mm stones (p=0.032).Overall treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between SWL and URS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Eulji University Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We examined patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopic removal of stone (URS) for proximal ureteral stones.

Materials and methods: We evaluated 224 consecutive patients who underwent SWL (n=156) or URS (n=68) for a single radiopaque proximal ureteral stone. Stone-free rates, defined as no visible fragment on a plain X-ray; complications; and patient satisfaction were compared. Patient satisfaction was examined through a specifically tailored questionnaire that included overall satisfaction (5 scales) and 4 domains (pain, voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status).

Results: The stone-free rates after the first, second, and third sessions of SWL were 36.5%, 65.4%, and 84.6%, respectively. The overall stone-free rate of URS was 82.4%, which was comparable to that of the third session of SWL. Complications were similar between the two groups except for greater steinstrasse in the SWL group. Overall satisfaction and voiding symptoms, cost, and stone-free status showed no significant difference between the groups. In the pain domain, the SWL group had a relatively lower satisfaction rate than did the URS group (p=0.05). Subanalysis showed that the satisfaction rate of the URS group with stone-free status was significantly lower than that of the SWL group in patients with ≥10 mm stones (p=0.032).

Conclusions: Overall treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between SWL and URS. However, patients undergoing URS for ≥10 mm proximal ureteral stones had lesser satisfaction with stone-free status, because of relatively lower stone-free rates due to upward stone migration. We suggest that factors regarding the subjective satisfaction of patients be included in counseling about treatment options for proximal ureteral stones.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus