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Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular death in men and women from the Norwegian Counties Study.

Lindman AS, Veierød MB, Tverdal A, Pedersen JI, Selmer R - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Bottom Line: In a model including the Framingham CHD risk score the effect of triglycerides disappeared in both men and women.In conclusion, nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of CVD death for both women and men.Adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, however, attenuated the effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anja.Schou.Lindman@kunnskapssenteret.no

ABSTRACT
The association between nonfasting triglycerides and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has recently been actualized. The aim of the present study was to investigate nonfasting triglycerides as a predictor of CVD mortality in men and women. A total of 86,261 participants in the Norwegian Counties Study 1974-2007, initially aged 20-50 years and free of CVD were included. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for deaths from CVD, ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke and all causes by level of nonfasting triglycerides. Mean follow-up was 27.0 years. A total of 9,528 men died (3,620 from CVD, 2,408 IHD, 543 stroke), and totally 5,267 women died (1,296 CVD, 626 IHD, 360 stroke). After adjustment for CVD risk factors other than HDL-cholesterol, the HRs (95% CI) per 1 mmol/l increase in nonfasting triglycerides were 1.16 (1.13-1.20), 1.20 (1.14-1.27), 1.26 (1.19-1.34) and 1.09 (0.96-1.23) for all cause mortality, CVD, IHD, and stroke mortality in women. Corresponding figures in men were 1.03 (1.01-1.04), 1.03 (1.00-1.05), 1.03 (1.00-1.06) and 0.99 (0.92-1.07). In a subsample where HDL-cholesterol was measured (n = 40,144), the association between CVD mortality and triglycerides observed in women disappeared after adjustment for HDL-cholesterol. In a model including the Framingham CHD risk score the effect of triglycerides disappeared in both men and women. In conclusion, nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of CVD death for both women and men. Adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, however, attenuated the effect. Nonfasting triglycerides added no predictive information on CVD mortality beyond the Framingham CHD risk score in men and women.

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Flow chart illustrating how study samples were obtained from the three screenings. *Exclusions: Participants reporting a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, diabetes, use of nitroglycerine or blood pressure reducing drugs, outside age range, extreme/missing triglyceride values or incomplete data on observation time
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Fig1: Flow chart illustrating how study samples were obtained from the three screenings. *Exclusions: Participants reporting a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, diabetes, use of nitroglycerine or blood pressure reducing drugs, outside age range, extreme/missing triglyceride values or incomplete data on observation time

Mentions: Three consecutive cardiovascular screenings (screenings I, II, and III) in the three Norwegian counties Oppland, Sogn og Fjordane, and Finnmark, were carried out in 1974–78, 1977–83, and 1985–88, respectively (Fig. 1). A detailed overview of the invited age groups and attendance according to survey and county has previously been described [13]. Briefly, in screening I all residents aged 35–49 years, and a random sample aged 20–34 years, were invited. In screening II, individuals from the previous screening still residing in the county were re-invited, in addition to a random sample aged 20–39 years. All inhabitants aged 40–54 years (40–62 years in Finnmark) and samples of previously invited, were invited to screening III. The attendance at each screening was 88, 88 and 84%. The methods and results from the first and second screening have been described in detail [14–16].Fig. 1


Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular death in men and women from the Norwegian Counties Study.

Lindman AS, Veierød MB, Tverdal A, Pedersen JI, Selmer R - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Flow chart illustrating how study samples were obtained from the three screenings. *Exclusions: Participants reporting a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, diabetes, use of nitroglycerine or blood pressure reducing drugs, outside age range, extreme/missing triglyceride values or incomplete data on observation time
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991549&req=5

Fig1: Flow chart illustrating how study samples were obtained from the three screenings. *Exclusions: Participants reporting a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, diabetes, use of nitroglycerine or blood pressure reducing drugs, outside age range, extreme/missing triglyceride values or incomplete data on observation time
Mentions: Three consecutive cardiovascular screenings (screenings I, II, and III) in the three Norwegian counties Oppland, Sogn og Fjordane, and Finnmark, were carried out in 1974–78, 1977–83, and 1985–88, respectively (Fig. 1). A detailed overview of the invited age groups and attendance according to survey and county has previously been described [13]. Briefly, in screening I all residents aged 35–49 years, and a random sample aged 20–34 years, were invited. In screening II, individuals from the previous screening still residing in the county were re-invited, in addition to a random sample aged 20–39 years. All inhabitants aged 40–54 years (40–62 years in Finnmark) and samples of previously invited, were invited to screening III. The attendance at each screening was 88, 88 and 84%. The methods and results from the first and second screening have been described in detail [14–16].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In a model including the Framingham CHD risk score the effect of triglycerides disappeared in both men and women.In conclusion, nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of CVD death for both women and men.Adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, however, attenuated the effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anja.Schou.Lindman@kunnskapssenteret.no

ABSTRACT
The association between nonfasting triglycerides and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has recently been actualized. The aim of the present study was to investigate nonfasting triglycerides as a predictor of CVD mortality in men and women. A total of 86,261 participants in the Norwegian Counties Study 1974-2007, initially aged 20-50 years and free of CVD were included. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for deaths from CVD, ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke and all causes by level of nonfasting triglycerides. Mean follow-up was 27.0 years. A total of 9,528 men died (3,620 from CVD, 2,408 IHD, 543 stroke), and totally 5,267 women died (1,296 CVD, 626 IHD, 360 stroke). After adjustment for CVD risk factors other than HDL-cholesterol, the HRs (95% CI) per 1 mmol/l increase in nonfasting triglycerides were 1.16 (1.13-1.20), 1.20 (1.14-1.27), 1.26 (1.19-1.34) and 1.09 (0.96-1.23) for all cause mortality, CVD, IHD, and stroke mortality in women. Corresponding figures in men were 1.03 (1.01-1.04), 1.03 (1.00-1.05), 1.03 (1.00-1.06) and 0.99 (0.92-1.07). In a subsample where HDL-cholesterol was measured (n = 40,144), the association between CVD mortality and triglycerides observed in women disappeared after adjustment for HDL-cholesterol. In a model including the Framingham CHD risk score the effect of triglycerides disappeared in both men and women. In conclusion, nonfasting triglycerides were associated with increased risk of CVD death for both women and men. Adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, however, attenuated the effect. Nonfasting triglycerides added no predictive information on CVD mortality beyond the Framingham CHD risk score in men and women.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus