Limits...
The Effects of Playing with Thin Dolls on Body Image and Food Intake in Young Girls.

Anschutz DJ, Engels RC - Sex Roles (2010)

Bottom Line: This study experimentally tested the effects of playing with thin dolls on body image and food intake in 6- to 10-year-old Dutch girls (N = 117).No differences were found between conditions for any of the body image variables.Although no support was found for the assumption that playing with thin dolls influences body image, the dolls directly affected actual food intake in these young girls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This study experimentally tested the effects of playing with thin dolls on body image and food intake in 6- to 10-year-old Dutch girls (N = 117). Girls were randomly assigned to play with a thin doll, an average-sized doll, or Legos in a no doll control condition. After 10 min, they participated in a taste-test and completed questionnaires about body image. No differences were found between conditions for any of the body image variables. However, girls who played with the average-sized doll ate significantly more food than girls in other exposure conditions. Although no support was found for the assumption that playing with thin dolls influences body image, the dolls directly affected actual food intake in these young girls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dolls (Emme, Tyler, and Barbie respectively)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991547&req=5

Fig1: Dolls (Emme, Tyler, and Barbie respectively)

Mentions: In the present study, we aimed at replicating and extending the study by Dittmar et al. (2006) by testing the effects of actually playing with thin dolls vs. playing with an average sized doll. Dittmar et al. (2006) found lower body esteem and higher body dissatisfaction in girls after exposure to images of the Barbie doll as compared to images of the Emme doll and the control condition. No differences between the Emme doll and the control condition were found on these variables. Dittmar et al. (2006) used pictures of the dolls as stimulus material in their experiment. It is possible that actually playing with the doll would have more profound effects since the body proportions of the doll become even more salient when they actually handle it. In addition, because the Emme doll does differ from the Barbie doll not only in body size but also literally in height and weight (see Fig. 1), a larger but equally slim doll (Tyler) as Barbie was included in the present study to control for the possible confounding effect of the smaller size of the Barbie doll. In addition, following Dittmar et al. (2006), a neutral condition was included to serve as a baseline condition for girls’ body image which involved playing with Legos instead of a doll. Similar to Dittmar et al. (2006), age differences were tested in the present study. Since we know that negative body image and dissatisfaction are associated with unhealthy eating behaviors such as dieting and bulimic eating behaviors (e.g., Stice 2001), it is essential to test whether playing with these different-sized dolls has a direct impact on eating behavior. Therefore, we included food intake as a dependent measure in the present study.Fig. 1


The Effects of Playing with Thin Dolls on Body Image and Food Intake in Young Girls.

Anschutz DJ, Engels RC - Sex Roles (2010)

Dolls (Emme, Tyler, and Barbie respectively)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991547&req=5

Fig1: Dolls (Emme, Tyler, and Barbie respectively)
Mentions: In the present study, we aimed at replicating and extending the study by Dittmar et al. (2006) by testing the effects of actually playing with thin dolls vs. playing with an average sized doll. Dittmar et al. (2006) found lower body esteem and higher body dissatisfaction in girls after exposure to images of the Barbie doll as compared to images of the Emme doll and the control condition. No differences between the Emme doll and the control condition were found on these variables. Dittmar et al. (2006) used pictures of the dolls as stimulus material in their experiment. It is possible that actually playing with the doll would have more profound effects since the body proportions of the doll become even more salient when they actually handle it. In addition, because the Emme doll does differ from the Barbie doll not only in body size but also literally in height and weight (see Fig. 1), a larger but equally slim doll (Tyler) as Barbie was included in the present study to control for the possible confounding effect of the smaller size of the Barbie doll. In addition, following Dittmar et al. (2006), a neutral condition was included to serve as a baseline condition for girls’ body image which involved playing with Legos instead of a doll. Similar to Dittmar et al. (2006), age differences were tested in the present study. Since we know that negative body image and dissatisfaction are associated with unhealthy eating behaviors such as dieting and bulimic eating behaviors (e.g., Stice 2001), it is essential to test whether playing with these different-sized dolls has a direct impact on eating behavior. Therefore, we included food intake as a dependent measure in the present study.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This study experimentally tested the effects of playing with thin dolls on body image and food intake in 6- to 10-year-old Dutch girls (N = 117).No differences were found between conditions for any of the body image variables.Although no support was found for the assumption that playing with thin dolls influences body image, the dolls directly affected actual food intake in these young girls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This study experimentally tested the effects of playing with thin dolls on body image and food intake in 6- to 10-year-old Dutch girls (N = 117). Girls were randomly assigned to play with a thin doll, an average-sized doll, or Legos in a no doll control condition. After 10 min, they participated in a taste-test and completed questionnaires about body image. No differences were found between conditions for any of the body image variables. However, girls who played with the average-sized doll ate significantly more food than girls in other exposure conditions. Although no support was found for the assumption that playing with thin dolls influences body image, the dolls directly affected actual food intake in these young girls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus