Limits...
Progressive posterior lenticonus in a patient with alport syndrome.

Al-Mahmood AM, Al-Swailem SA, Al-Khalaf A, Al-Binali GY - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: At initial presentation, the patient had bilateral anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and renal failure.Further examination revealed progressive posterior lenticonus that was not present initially.The presence of such finding is important because it influences the surgical approach to avoid complications during cataract surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anterior Segment, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
We report a rare case of Alport syndrome with progressive posterior lenticonus. A 24-year-old male presented to our tertiary eye care center with history of poor vision. At initial presentation, the patient had bilateral anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and renal failure. The patient was diagnosed with Alport syndrome based on a positive family history of the disease and clinical findings. Further examination revealed progressive posterior lenticonus that was not present initially. The presence of such finding is important because it influences the surgical approach to avoid complications during cataract surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anterior lenticonus in the right eye in a patient with Alport syndrome
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Figure 0001: Anterior lenticonus in the right eye in a patient with Alport syndrome

Mentions: Ocular examination revealed best corrected visual acuity of 20/80+1 in the right eye and 20/60+1 in the left eye. The patient’s manifest refraction was –2.50 –0.25 × 80 in the right eye and –2.50 –2.50 × 95 in the left eye. Intraocular pressure was normal bilaterally. Slit lamp examination of the right eye was within normal limits except for advanced anterior lenticonus, and fleck retinopathy was present on fundus examination [Figure 1]. The left eye, on examination, was within normal limits with the exception of anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and fleck retinopathy. Direct ophthalmoscopy revealed an oil droplet reflex bilaterally [Figure 2]. The diagnosis of Alport syndrome was made and the patient was advised to seek additional care from a nephrologist and an ear, nose, and throat specialist. Eighteen months later, the patient developed progressive posterior lenticonus bilaterally [Figure 3]. Progression of the cataract in the left eye was also noted. The manifest refraction changed to –4.00 –1.00 × 85 and –8.00 –0.75 ×125 in the right and left eyes, respectively. One year after his initial presentation, the patient underwent renal transplant for his chronic renal failure. The patient was kept on regular follow-up visits as the decision for cataract surgery was delayed as the patient’s vision was not significantly affected.


Progressive posterior lenticonus in a patient with alport syndrome.

Al-Mahmood AM, Al-Swailem SA, Al-Khalaf A, Al-Binali GY - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Anterior lenticonus in the right eye in a patient with Alport syndrome
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991461&req=5

Figure 0001: Anterior lenticonus in the right eye in a patient with Alport syndrome
Mentions: Ocular examination revealed best corrected visual acuity of 20/80+1 in the right eye and 20/60+1 in the left eye. The patient’s manifest refraction was –2.50 –0.25 × 80 in the right eye and –2.50 –2.50 × 95 in the left eye. Intraocular pressure was normal bilaterally. Slit lamp examination of the right eye was within normal limits except for advanced anterior lenticonus, and fleck retinopathy was present on fundus examination [Figure 1]. The left eye, on examination, was within normal limits with the exception of anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and fleck retinopathy. Direct ophthalmoscopy revealed an oil droplet reflex bilaterally [Figure 2]. The diagnosis of Alport syndrome was made and the patient was advised to seek additional care from a nephrologist and an ear, nose, and throat specialist. Eighteen months later, the patient developed progressive posterior lenticonus bilaterally [Figure 3]. Progression of the cataract in the left eye was also noted. The manifest refraction changed to –4.00 –1.00 × 85 and –8.00 –0.75 ×125 in the right and left eyes, respectively. One year after his initial presentation, the patient underwent renal transplant for his chronic renal failure. The patient was kept on regular follow-up visits as the decision for cataract surgery was delayed as the patient’s vision was not significantly affected.

Bottom Line: At initial presentation, the patient had bilateral anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and renal failure.Further examination revealed progressive posterior lenticonus that was not present initially.The presence of such finding is important because it influences the surgical approach to avoid complications during cataract surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anterior Segment, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
We report a rare case of Alport syndrome with progressive posterior lenticonus. A 24-year-old male presented to our tertiary eye care center with history of poor vision. At initial presentation, the patient had bilateral anterior lenticonus, posterior subcapsular cataract, and renal failure. The patient was diagnosed with Alport syndrome based on a positive family history of the disease and clinical findings. Further examination revealed progressive posterior lenticonus that was not present initially. The presence of such finding is important because it influences the surgical approach to avoid complications during cataract surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus