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A forecast of ophthalmology practice trends in saudi arabia: a survey of junior residents.

Alwadani F, Alrushood A, Altokhy H, Alasbali T - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: A P-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant for all analyses.Concerted efforts are required to encourage adoption to ophthalmic practice in public institutions rather than in private practice.In addition training in underrepresented subspecilaties should be encouraged to ensure adequate ophthalmic care for all citizens of Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, King Faisal University, King Fahad Hospital of the University, P. O. Box 2208, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, 31952.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study is to identify the trends in practice pattern among current ophthalmology residents in Saudi Arabia.

Materials and methods: Ophthalmology residents in Saudi Arabia responded anonymously to a written survey between November 2007 and February 2008. The survey contained questions on demographic information, medical education, residency training, career goals and factors influencing their career choice. The data were categorized by gender. The influence of gender on outcome was assessed in a univariate fashion using the Chi-square or Fisher exact test when appropriate. A P-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant for all analyses.

Results: A total of 68 out of 85 residents (80%) responded to the survey. Over one-half of the residents preferred to pursue a fellowship within Saudi Arabia (53%), while others (25%) planned to train in North America. The majority of respondents wished to practice in an urban setting (63%). Anterior segment was the most desired subspecialty, while general ophthalmology and glaucoma were not a popular choice. Most residents were interested in refractive surgery (77%) and research (75%). The main factor influencing the decision to pursue ophthalmology was the ability to combine medicine and surgery (97%), while a positive elective experience was also an important factor, particularly for female respondents (91% vs. 57%; P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Concerted efforts are required to encourage adoption to ophthalmic practice in public institutions rather than in private practice. In addition training in underrepresented subspecilaties should be encouraged to ensure adequate ophthalmic care for all citizens of Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Responses to “What are your future plans after training”
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Figure 0002: Responses to “What are your future plans after training”

Mentions: In response to future plans after completion of ophthalmology residency, more than half (53%) of the respondents indicated that they preferred to pursue a fellowship in Saudi Arabia (53%) and one-third of the respondents wished to be trained in North America (25%) or elsewhere overseas (9%) [Figure 2]. Only 15% wished to practice as a general ophthalmologist. When asked about their preferred subspecialty training [Figure 3], anterior segment was the most popular choice (33%), whereas surgical retina, glaucoma and pediatric ophthalmology were equally favored (9% each). Thirty percent of the residents were undecided at the time of the survey.


A forecast of ophthalmology practice trends in saudi arabia: a survey of junior residents.

Alwadani F, Alrushood A, Altokhy H, Alasbali T - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Responses to “What are your future plans after training”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991453&req=5

Figure 0002: Responses to “What are your future plans after training”
Mentions: In response to future plans after completion of ophthalmology residency, more than half (53%) of the respondents indicated that they preferred to pursue a fellowship in Saudi Arabia (53%) and one-third of the respondents wished to be trained in North America (25%) or elsewhere overseas (9%) [Figure 2]. Only 15% wished to practice as a general ophthalmologist. When asked about their preferred subspecialty training [Figure 3], anterior segment was the most popular choice (33%), whereas surgical retina, glaucoma and pediatric ophthalmology were equally favored (9% each). Thirty percent of the residents were undecided at the time of the survey.

Bottom Line: A P-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant for all analyses.Concerted efforts are required to encourage adoption to ophthalmic practice in public institutions rather than in private practice.In addition training in underrepresented subspecilaties should be encouraged to ensure adequate ophthalmic care for all citizens of Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, King Faisal University, King Fahad Hospital of the University, P. O. Box 2208, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, 31952.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study is to identify the trends in practice pattern among current ophthalmology residents in Saudi Arabia.

Materials and methods: Ophthalmology residents in Saudi Arabia responded anonymously to a written survey between November 2007 and February 2008. The survey contained questions on demographic information, medical education, residency training, career goals and factors influencing their career choice. The data were categorized by gender. The influence of gender on outcome was assessed in a univariate fashion using the Chi-square or Fisher exact test when appropriate. A P-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant for all analyses.

Results: A total of 68 out of 85 residents (80%) responded to the survey. Over one-half of the residents preferred to pursue a fellowship within Saudi Arabia (53%), while others (25%) planned to train in North America. The majority of respondents wished to practice in an urban setting (63%). Anterior segment was the most desired subspecialty, while general ophthalmology and glaucoma were not a popular choice. Most residents were interested in refractive surgery (77%) and research (75%). The main factor influencing the decision to pursue ophthalmology was the ability to combine medicine and surgery (97%), while a positive elective experience was also an important factor, particularly for female respondents (91% vs. 57%; P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Concerted efforts are required to encourage adoption to ophthalmic practice in public institutions rather than in private practice. In addition training in underrepresented subspecilaties should be encouraged to ensure adequate ophthalmic care for all citizens of Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus