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Incidence and complications of traditional eye medications in Nigeria in a teaching hospital.

Ukponmwan CU, Momoh N - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.There was no significant difference in the type of medication used and ocular complications (P = 0.956).Proper health education of the public and traditional healers can reduce the prevalence of preventable blindness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the types and nature of traditional eye medications (TEMs), their sources, and the ocular complications that may arise from use in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.

Materials and methods: A prospective study of consecutive subjects who used TEM before presentation to the Eye Clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between July 1, 2004 and June 30, 2008. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: A total of 113 subjects were evaluated of which 64 were males (56.6%), females (43.4%) were females. There was no significant difference in the number of males and females (P > 0.05). Rural dwellers were more likely to use TEM than urban dwellers (P < 0.0001). The mean age of the subjects was 47.9 ± 22.3 years (range, 4-90 years). The most common traditional medication was derived from plant extracts (54.9%) followed by concoctions (21.2%). Complications occurred in 54.8% of the subjects. Ocular complications included corneal opacities in 13.35% of subjects, staphyloma in 9%, and corneal ulcers in 8%. Other complications were panophthalmitis, endophthalmitis, uveitis, cataract, and bullous keratopathy. Eleven subjects underwent evisceration or enucleation of the affected eye. There was no significant difference in the type of medication used and ocular complications (P = 0.956). Sources of TEM were self-medication in 38.9% of subjects, relatives in 27.4%, and traditional healers in 17.7%.

Conclusion: The use of TEM is a common practice that could be harmful and lead to blindness. Proper health education of the public and traditional healers can reduce the prevalence of preventable blindness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Eye with corneal opacity secondary to traditional eye medication
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Figure 0004: Eye with corneal opacity secondary to traditional eye medication

Mentions: The visual acuity improved in 5.3% of the subjects, there was no improvement in 83.2% of the subjects and 11.5% had reduction in visual acuity after treatment. Ninety-two subjects were blind in the affected eye with a final visual acuity of less than 3/60 as shown in Table 5. One subject was blind bilaterally from corneal opacities due to the use of TEM. Figure 4 shows an eye with a corneal opacity from the use of TEM. Some of these subjects were already blind or had poor vision from pre-existing ocular diseases such as cataract and glaucoma and this precipitated the use of TEM.Table 5


Incidence and complications of traditional eye medications in Nigeria in a teaching hospital.

Ukponmwan CU, Momoh N - Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol (2010)

Eye with corneal opacity secondary to traditional eye medication
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991448&req=5

Figure 0004: Eye with corneal opacity secondary to traditional eye medication
Mentions: The visual acuity improved in 5.3% of the subjects, there was no improvement in 83.2% of the subjects and 11.5% had reduction in visual acuity after treatment. Ninety-two subjects were blind in the affected eye with a final visual acuity of less than 3/60 as shown in Table 5. One subject was blind bilaterally from corneal opacities due to the use of TEM. Figure 4 shows an eye with a corneal opacity from the use of TEM. Some of these subjects were already blind or had poor vision from pre-existing ocular diseases such as cataract and glaucoma and this precipitated the use of TEM.Table 5

Bottom Line: P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.There was no significant difference in the type of medication used and ocular complications (P = 0.956).Proper health education of the public and traditional healers can reduce the prevalence of preventable blindness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the types and nature of traditional eye medications (TEMs), their sources, and the ocular complications that may arise from use in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.

Materials and methods: A prospective study of consecutive subjects who used TEM before presentation to the Eye Clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between July 1, 2004 and June 30, 2008. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: A total of 113 subjects were evaluated of which 64 were males (56.6%), females (43.4%) were females. There was no significant difference in the number of males and females (P > 0.05). Rural dwellers were more likely to use TEM than urban dwellers (P < 0.0001). The mean age of the subjects was 47.9 ± 22.3 years (range, 4-90 years). The most common traditional medication was derived from plant extracts (54.9%) followed by concoctions (21.2%). Complications occurred in 54.8% of the subjects. Ocular complications included corneal opacities in 13.35% of subjects, staphyloma in 9%, and corneal ulcers in 8%. Other complications were panophthalmitis, endophthalmitis, uveitis, cataract, and bullous keratopathy. Eleven subjects underwent evisceration or enucleation of the affected eye. There was no significant difference in the type of medication used and ocular complications (P = 0.956). Sources of TEM were self-medication in 38.9% of subjects, relatives in 27.4%, and traditional healers in 17.7%.

Conclusion: The use of TEM is a common practice that could be harmful and lead to blindness. Proper health education of the public and traditional healers can reduce the prevalence of preventable blindness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus