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Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

Koerdt A, Gödeke J, Berger J, Thormann KM, Albers SV - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments.While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells.The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Biology of Archaea, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments.

Methodology: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells.

Conclusion: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

Show MeSH
Connections between cells in three days matured static biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, S. tokodaii and S. solfataricus.The left three pictures show the CLSM analysis of a ConA treated S. tokodaii biofilm (LM: light microscopy picture, ConA: green channel, Overlay: overlay of the ConA signal and the LM picture). Middel panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. acidocaldarius biofilm. Right panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. solfataricus biofilm. Arrows indicate the connections. Bars are 4,5 µm in length. CLSM: confocal laser scanning microscopy; LC: light microscopy.
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pone-0014104-g004: Connections between cells in three days matured static biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, S. tokodaii and S. solfataricus.The left three pictures show the CLSM analysis of a ConA treated S. tokodaii biofilm (LM: light microscopy picture, ConA: green channel, Overlay: overlay of the ConA signal and the LM picture). Middel panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. acidocaldarius biofilm. Right panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. solfataricus biofilm. Arrows indicate the connections. Bars are 4,5 µm in length. CLSM: confocal laser scanning microscopy; LC: light microscopy.

Mentions: A detailed analysis of a biofilm formed by S. tokodaii and S. acidocaldarius showed extensive cell-cell connections. These connections became visible when the S. tokodaii sample was incubated with ConA and analysed by CLSM (Fig. 4). The connection might be a string of sugars or flagella/pili in which the subunits are glycosylated. In S. acidocaldarius and S. solfataricus biofilms the lectin GSII also stained thin connections between the cells (Fig. 4) which were clearly visible also in SEM pictures (Fig. 5D).


Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

Koerdt A, Gödeke J, Berger J, Thormann KM, Albers SV - PLoS ONE (2010)

Connections between cells in three days matured static biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, S. tokodaii and S. solfataricus.The left three pictures show the CLSM analysis of a ConA treated S. tokodaii biofilm (LM: light microscopy picture, ConA: green channel, Overlay: overlay of the ConA signal and the LM picture). Middel panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. acidocaldarius biofilm. Right panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. solfataricus biofilm. Arrows indicate the connections. Bars are 4,5 µm in length. CLSM: confocal laser scanning microscopy; LC: light microscopy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991349&req=5

pone-0014104-g004: Connections between cells in three days matured static biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, S. tokodaii and S. solfataricus.The left three pictures show the CLSM analysis of a ConA treated S. tokodaii biofilm (LM: light microscopy picture, ConA: green channel, Overlay: overlay of the ConA signal and the LM picture). Middel panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. acidocaldarius biofilm. Right panel: CLSM analysis of GS-II (yellow) treated S. solfataricus biofilm. Arrows indicate the connections. Bars are 4,5 µm in length. CLSM: confocal laser scanning microscopy; LC: light microscopy.
Mentions: A detailed analysis of a biofilm formed by S. tokodaii and S. acidocaldarius showed extensive cell-cell connections. These connections became visible when the S. tokodaii sample was incubated with ConA and analysed by CLSM (Fig. 4). The connection might be a string of sugars or flagella/pili in which the subunits are glycosylated. In S. acidocaldarius and S. solfataricus biofilms the lectin GSII also stained thin connections between the cells (Fig. 4) which were clearly visible also in SEM pictures (Fig. 5D).

Bottom Line: However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments.While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells.The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Biology of Archaea, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments.

Methodology: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells.

Conclusion: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

Show MeSH