Limits...
Gesturing Meaning: Non-action Words Activate the Motor System.

Bach P, Griffiths D, Weigelt M, Tipper SP - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: These results were obtained even though the objects were not associated with any motor behaviors that would match the gestures the participants had to produce.Moreover, implied shape affected not only gesture selection processes but also their actual execution - as measured by the shape of hand motion through space - revealing intimate links between implied shape representation and motor output.The results are discussed in terms of ideomotor theories of action and perception, and provide one avenue for explaining the ubiquitous phenomenon of iconic gestures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
Across cultures, speakers produce iconic gestures, which add - through the movement of the speakers' hands - a pictorial dimension to the speakers' message. These gestures capture not only the motor content but also the visuospatial content of the message. Here, we provide first evidence for a direct link between the representation of perceptual information and the motor system that can account for these observations. Across four experiments, participants' hand movements captured both shapes that were directly perceived, and shapes that were only implicitly activated by unrelated semantic judgments of object words. These results were obtained even though the objects were not associated with any motor behaviors that would match the gestures the participants had to produce. Moreover, implied shape affected not only gesture selection processes but also their actual execution - as measured by the shape of hand motion through space - revealing intimate links between implied shape representation and motor output. The results are discussed in terms of ideomotor theories of action and perception, and provide one avenue for explaining the ubiquitous phenomenon of iconic gestures.

No MeSH data available.


(A) Represents the percentage of erroneous trials detected by the correlation procedure. Error bars show the standard error of the mean. (B) Shows the trajectories for circles and squares in the compatible and incompatible trials. Dots next to the trajectories mark significant differences in pairwise two-sided t-tests (gray, p < 0.10, black; p < 0.05) between the compatible and incompatible conditions for circles and squares for each of the y coordinates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991204&req=5

Figure 6: (A) Represents the percentage of erroneous trials detected by the correlation procedure. Error bars show the standard error of the mean. (B) Shows the trajectories for circles and squares in the compatible and incompatible trials. Dots next to the trajectories mark significant differences in pairwise two-sided t-tests (gray, p < 0.10, black; p < 0.05) between the compatible and incompatible conditions for circles and squares for each of the y coordinates.

Mentions: Figure 6A shows the percentage of erroneous trials identified by the correlation criterion in each condition. An analysis performed on the participants mean error rates revealed no main effect of Gesture (F[1, 14] = 1.66; p = 0.219) and no main effect of Shape (F[1, 14] = 2.82; p = 0.116), but the critical interaction was marginally significant (F[1, 14] = 3.71; p = 0.075; η2 = 0.209). When required to produce a square, participants more often erroneously produced a circle after reading a round word than after reading a square word (t[14] = 2.74; p = 0.016). For circles, a small and non-significant (t[14] < 1) difference in the other direction was apparent.


Gesturing Meaning: Non-action Words Activate the Motor System.

Bach P, Griffiths D, Weigelt M, Tipper SP - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

(A) Represents the percentage of erroneous trials detected by the correlation procedure. Error bars show the standard error of the mean. (B) Shows the trajectories for circles and squares in the compatible and incompatible trials. Dots next to the trajectories mark significant differences in pairwise two-sided t-tests (gray, p < 0.10, black; p < 0.05) between the compatible and incompatible conditions for circles and squares for each of the y coordinates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991204&req=5

Figure 6: (A) Represents the percentage of erroneous trials detected by the correlation procedure. Error bars show the standard error of the mean. (B) Shows the trajectories for circles and squares in the compatible and incompatible trials. Dots next to the trajectories mark significant differences in pairwise two-sided t-tests (gray, p < 0.10, black; p < 0.05) between the compatible and incompatible conditions for circles and squares for each of the y coordinates.
Mentions: Figure 6A shows the percentage of erroneous trials identified by the correlation criterion in each condition. An analysis performed on the participants mean error rates revealed no main effect of Gesture (F[1, 14] = 1.66; p = 0.219) and no main effect of Shape (F[1, 14] = 2.82; p = 0.116), but the critical interaction was marginally significant (F[1, 14] = 3.71; p = 0.075; η2 = 0.209). When required to produce a square, participants more often erroneously produced a circle after reading a round word than after reading a square word (t[14] = 2.74; p = 0.016). For circles, a small and non-significant (t[14] < 1) difference in the other direction was apparent.

Bottom Line: These results were obtained even though the objects were not associated with any motor behaviors that would match the gestures the participants had to produce.Moreover, implied shape affected not only gesture selection processes but also their actual execution - as measured by the shape of hand motion through space - revealing intimate links between implied shape representation and motor output.The results are discussed in terms of ideomotor theories of action and perception, and provide one avenue for explaining the ubiquitous phenomenon of iconic gestures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
Across cultures, speakers produce iconic gestures, which add - through the movement of the speakers' hands - a pictorial dimension to the speakers' message. These gestures capture not only the motor content but also the visuospatial content of the message. Here, we provide first evidence for a direct link between the representation of perceptual information and the motor system that can account for these observations. Across four experiments, participants' hand movements captured both shapes that were directly perceived, and shapes that were only implicitly activated by unrelated semantic judgments of object words. These results were obtained even though the objects were not associated with any motor behaviors that would match the gestures the participants had to produce. Moreover, implied shape affected not only gesture selection processes but also their actual execution - as measured by the shape of hand motion through space - revealing intimate links between implied shape representation and motor output. The results are discussed in terms of ideomotor theories of action and perception, and provide one avenue for explaining the ubiquitous phenomenon of iconic gestures.

No MeSH data available.