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Neural correlates of learning to attend.

Kelley TA, Yantis S - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Training led to a reduction in behavioral distraction effects, and these improvements in performance generalized to untrained conditions.Although large regions of early visual and posterior parietal cortices responded to the presence of distractors, these regions did not exhibit significant changes in their response following training.We conclude that training did not change the robustness of the initial sensory response, but led to increased efficiency in late-stage filtering in the trained conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Mind and Brain, University of California at Davis Davis, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recent work has shown that training can improve attentional focus. Little is known, however, about how training in attention and multitasking affects the brain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure changes in cortical responses to distracting stimuli during training on a visual categorization task. Training led to a reduction in behavioral distraction effects, and these improvements in performance generalized to untrained conditions. Although large regions of early visual and posterior parietal cortices responded to the presence of distractors, these regions did not exhibit significant changes in their response following training. In contrast, middle frontal gyrus did exhibit decreased distractor-related responses with practice, showing the same trend as behavior for previously observed distractor locations. However, the neural response in this region diverged from behavior for novel distractor locations, showing greater activity. We conclude that training did not change the robustness of the initial sensory response, but led to increased efficiency in late-stage filtering in the trained conditions.

No MeSH data available.


(A) Bowtie stimuli used for retinotopic mapping. (B) Disc stimuli used for functional localization of regions processing the distractor locations.
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Figure 2: (A) Bowtie stimuli used for retinotopic mapping. (B) Disc stimuli used for functional localization of regions processing the distractor locations.

Mentions: The stimuli for the retinotopic mapping procedure, described below, consisted of horizontal and vertical wedges arranged in a “bowtie” pattern. The wedges were black and white checkerboards oscillating at a rate of 8 Hz, presented on a gray background. The wedges constituted an arc of 30 radial degrees through a circle with a radius of 12.5° of visual angle, centered at fixation. The functional localizer stimuli were disks that subtended roughly the same area as the distractor images; two disks would appear alternately in “old” distractor locations and “new” distractor locations. These disks were presented on a gray background and contained black and white quarters which oscillated at a rate of 5 Hz. Figure 2 shows examples of both types of stimuli.


Neural correlates of learning to attend.

Kelley TA, Yantis S - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

(A) Bowtie stimuli used for retinotopic mapping. (B) Disc stimuli used for functional localization of regions processing the distractor locations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991198&req=5

Figure 2: (A) Bowtie stimuli used for retinotopic mapping. (B) Disc stimuli used for functional localization of regions processing the distractor locations.
Mentions: The stimuli for the retinotopic mapping procedure, described below, consisted of horizontal and vertical wedges arranged in a “bowtie” pattern. The wedges were black and white checkerboards oscillating at a rate of 8 Hz, presented on a gray background. The wedges constituted an arc of 30 radial degrees through a circle with a radius of 12.5° of visual angle, centered at fixation. The functional localizer stimuli were disks that subtended roughly the same area as the distractor images; two disks would appear alternately in “old” distractor locations and “new” distractor locations. These disks were presented on a gray background and contained black and white quarters which oscillated at a rate of 5 Hz. Figure 2 shows examples of both types of stimuli.

Bottom Line: Training led to a reduction in behavioral distraction effects, and these improvements in performance generalized to untrained conditions.Although large regions of early visual and posterior parietal cortices responded to the presence of distractors, these regions did not exhibit significant changes in their response following training.We conclude that training did not change the robustness of the initial sensory response, but led to increased efficiency in late-stage filtering in the trained conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Mind and Brain, University of California at Davis Davis, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recent work has shown that training can improve attentional focus. Little is known, however, about how training in attention and multitasking affects the brain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure changes in cortical responses to distracting stimuli during training on a visual categorization task. Training led to a reduction in behavioral distraction effects, and these improvements in performance generalized to untrained conditions. Although large regions of early visual and posterior parietal cortices responded to the presence of distractors, these regions did not exhibit significant changes in their response following training. In contrast, middle frontal gyrus did exhibit decreased distractor-related responses with practice, showing the same trend as behavior for previously observed distractor locations. However, the neural response in this region diverged from behavior for novel distractor locations, showing greater activity. We conclude that training did not change the robustness of the initial sensory response, but led to increased efficiency in late-stage filtering in the trained conditions.

No MeSH data available.