Limits...
The effect of three months of aerobic training on response preparation in older adults.

Renaud M, Maquestiaux F, Joncas S, Kergoat MJ, Bherer L - Front Aging Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of an aerobic training program on reaction time tasks that manipulated preparatory intervals (PI) to produce temporal preparation effects using short (1, 3, 5 s) and long (5, 7, 9 s) PI.The control group did not receive any training.Results indicated that 12 weeks of aerobic training induced a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory capacity (VO(2)max estimate).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Québec at Montréal Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
This study assessed the effects of an aerobic training program on reaction time tasks that manipulated preparatory intervals (PI) to produce temporal preparation effects using short (1, 3, 5 s) and long (5, 7, 9 s) PI. Older adults were assigned to either a 3-month aerobic training group or to a control group. Individuals in the training group participated in an aerobic training program of three 60-min sessions per week. The control group did not receive any training. Results indicated that 12 weeks of aerobic training induced a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory capacity (VO(2)max estimate). All participants who completed the aerobic program showed improvement after training in the choice RT task, along with enhanced preparation, such that they maintained preparation over time more efficiently after the training program. Moreover, enhanced ability to use the short PI was observed but only in lower fit individuals. Results of the present study suggest that improving aerobic fitness may enhance attentional control mechanisms in older adults.

No MeSH data available.


Mean VO2max estimate (A) and walking time (B) in the Rockport one-mile test at pre-test and post-test sessions, in the control and the training groups (Bars represent standard errors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991190&req=5

Figure 2: Mean VO2max estimate (A) and walking time (B) in the Rockport one-mile test at pre-test and post-test sessions, in the control and the training groups (Bars represent standard errors).

Mentions: Analyses performed on the VO2max estimate showed a main effect of baseline fitness level, F (1, 46) = 30.92, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.40, and a significant baseline fitness level × time interaction, F (1, 46) = 5.32, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.10, as the VO2max estimate improved to a greater extent in the lower fit group, F (1, 24) = 14.36, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.37, compared to the higher fit group, F (1, 24) = 5.71, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.19). Of major interest for the present study, a significant group × time interaction (see Figure 2A) was found, F (1, 46) = 25.43, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.36, which confirmed that the participants in the training group showed significant improvement in the VO2max estimate after 3 months of physical fitness training, F (1, 24) = 43.29, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.64, while the VO2max of control participants remained unchanged, F (1, 24) < 1. The analysis of walking time also confirmed the benefits of the aerobic fitness intervention, as evidenced by a main effect of baseline fitness level, F (1, 46) = 23.06, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.33, along with a significant group × time interaction, F (1, 46) = 32.79, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.42 (see Figure 2B). Participants in the training group walked the mile faster after the 12-week training program, F (1, 24) = 49.28, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.67, whereas the walk time of participants in the control group did not change significantly, F (1, 24) < 1. It is important to emphasize that the aerobic training effects on the cardiorespiratory fitness assessment was equivalent in both the lower and the higher fit groups as indicated by the absence of a three-way interaction on VO2max estimate, F (1, 46) = 1.25, ns, and walking time, F (1, 46) < 1.


The effect of three months of aerobic training on response preparation in older adults.

Renaud M, Maquestiaux F, Joncas S, Kergoat MJ, Bherer L - Front Aging Neurosci (2010)

Mean VO2max estimate (A) and walking time (B) in the Rockport one-mile test at pre-test and post-test sessions, in the control and the training groups (Bars represent standard errors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2991190&req=5

Figure 2: Mean VO2max estimate (A) and walking time (B) in the Rockport one-mile test at pre-test and post-test sessions, in the control and the training groups (Bars represent standard errors).
Mentions: Analyses performed on the VO2max estimate showed a main effect of baseline fitness level, F (1, 46) = 30.92, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.40, and a significant baseline fitness level × time interaction, F (1, 46) = 5.32, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.10, as the VO2max estimate improved to a greater extent in the lower fit group, F (1, 24) = 14.36, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.37, compared to the higher fit group, F (1, 24) = 5.71, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.19). Of major interest for the present study, a significant group × time interaction (see Figure 2A) was found, F (1, 46) = 25.43, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.36, which confirmed that the participants in the training group showed significant improvement in the VO2max estimate after 3 months of physical fitness training, F (1, 24) = 43.29, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.64, while the VO2max of control participants remained unchanged, F (1, 24) < 1. The analysis of walking time also confirmed the benefits of the aerobic fitness intervention, as evidenced by a main effect of baseline fitness level, F (1, 46) = 23.06, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.33, along with a significant group × time interaction, F (1, 46) = 32.79, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.42 (see Figure 2B). Participants in the training group walked the mile faster after the 12-week training program, F (1, 24) = 49.28, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.67, whereas the walk time of participants in the control group did not change significantly, F (1, 24) < 1. It is important to emphasize that the aerobic training effects on the cardiorespiratory fitness assessment was equivalent in both the lower and the higher fit groups as indicated by the absence of a three-way interaction on VO2max estimate, F (1, 46) = 1.25, ns, and walking time, F (1, 46) < 1.

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of an aerobic training program on reaction time tasks that manipulated preparatory intervals (PI) to produce temporal preparation effects using short (1, 3, 5 s) and long (5, 7, 9 s) PI.The control group did not receive any training.Results indicated that 12 weeks of aerobic training induced a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory capacity (VO(2)max estimate).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Québec at Montréal Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
This study assessed the effects of an aerobic training program on reaction time tasks that manipulated preparatory intervals (PI) to produce temporal preparation effects using short (1, 3, 5 s) and long (5, 7, 9 s) PI. Older adults were assigned to either a 3-month aerobic training group or to a control group. Individuals in the training group participated in an aerobic training program of three 60-min sessions per week. The control group did not receive any training. Results indicated that 12 weeks of aerobic training induced a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory capacity (VO(2)max estimate). All participants who completed the aerobic program showed improvement after training in the choice RT task, along with enhanced preparation, such that they maintained preparation over time more efficiently after the training program. Moreover, enhanced ability to use the short PI was observed but only in lower fit individuals. Results of the present study suggest that improving aerobic fitness may enhance attentional control mechanisms in older adults.

No MeSH data available.