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Combining domestic and foreign investment to expand tuberculosis control in China.

Jia ZW, Cheng SM, Li ZJ, Du X, Huang F, Jia XW, Kong P, Liu YX, Chen W, Wang W, Dye C - PLoS Med. (2010)

Bottom Line: Jia and colleagues describe how a combination of increased domestic funding, supplemented by foreign loans and donations since 2002, have led to a dramatic increase in tuberculosis case finding in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Jia and colleagues describe how a combination of increased domestic funding, supplemented by foreign loans and donations since 2002, have led to a dramatic increase in tuberculosis case finding in China.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Average TB case notifications per 100,000 populations by county, 2001–2008. (B–G) Distribution of counties that were TB hotspots over the period 2003–2008.
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pmed-1000371-g001: (A) Average TB case notifications per 100,000 populations by county, 2001–2008. (B–G) Distribution of counties that were TB hotspots over the period 2003–2008.

Mentions: To decide how to allocate funds across China, the spatial distribution of TB cases was mapped to identify clusters (neighbouring counties with similar TB notification rates) and hotspots (counties with high notification rates within clusters) (Text S1). Mapping revealed that about 70% of the variation in the case notification rate was among provinces and 30% among counties (Text S1). Most of the variation was therefore on a larger (among provinces) rather than smaller (among counties) geographical scale (Figure 1A). However, there was significant clustering of cases at county level in each of the 6 years 2003–2008. Persistent hotspots were detected in western (Xinjiang, Neimeng, Gansu, Xizang, Qinghai, Shaanxi provinces) and central China (Hunan, Hubei, Henan, Chongqing, Guizhou provinces), and 307,638 cases were reported from these hotspots between 2003 and 2008, an average of 31 cases/100,000 population/year. Allowing for differences among counties in age and sex, case notification rates were higher in poorer counties, and in countries populated by minority groups (Text S1).


Combining domestic and foreign investment to expand tuberculosis control in China.

Jia ZW, Cheng SM, Li ZJ, Du X, Huang F, Jia XW, Kong P, Liu YX, Chen W, Wang W, Dye C - PLoS Med. (2010)

(A) Average TB case notifications per 100,000 populations by county, 2001–2008. (B–G) Distribution of counties that were TB hotspots over the period 2003–2008.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990708&req=5

pmed-1000371-g001: (A) Average TB case notifications per 100,000 populations by county, 2001–2008. (B–G) Distribution of counties that were TB hotspots over the period 2003–2008.
Mentions: To decide how to allocate funds across China, the spatial distribution of TB cases was mapped to identify clusters (neighbouring counties with similar TB notification rates) and hotspots (counties with high notification rates within clusters) (Text S1). Mapping revealed that about 70% of the variation in the case notification rate was among provinces and 30% among counties (Text S1). Most of the variation was therefore on a larger (among provinces) rather than smaller (among counties) geographical scale (Figure 1A). However, there was significant clustering of cases at county level in each of the 6 years 2003–2008. Persistent hotspots were detected in western (Xinjiang, Neimeng, Gansu, Xizang, Qinghai, Shaanxi provinces) and central China (Hunan, Hubei, Henan, Chongqing, Guizhou provinces), and 307,638 cases were reported from these hotspots between 2003 and 2008, an average of 31 cases/100,000 population/year. Allowing for differences among counties in age and sex, case notification rates were higher in poorer counties, and in countries populated by minority groups (Text S1).

Bottom Line: Jia and colleagues describe how a combination of increased domestic funding, supplemented by foreign loans and donations since 2002, have led to a dramatic increase in tuberculosis case finding in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Jia and colleagues describe how a combination of increased domestic funding, supplemented by foreign loans and donations since 2002, have led to a dramatic increase in tuberculosis case finding in China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus